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Technical Change, Non-Tariff Barriers, and the Development of the Italian Locomotive Industry, 1850-1913

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  • Carlo Ciccarelli
  • Alessandro Nuvolari

Abstract

This paper examines the dynamics of technical change in the Italian locomotive industry in the period 1850-1913. From an historical point of view, this industry presents a major point of interest: it was one of the few relatively sophisticated "high-tech" sectors in which Italy, a latecomer country, was able to set foot firmly before 1913. Using technical data on the performance of different vintages of locomotives, we construct a new industry-level index of technical change. Our reassessment reveals the critical role played by non-tariff barriers for the emergence and consolidation of national manufacturers in this field.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlo Ciccarelli & Alessandro Nuvolari, 2014. "Technical Change, Non-Tariff Barriers, and the Development of the Italian Locomotive Industry, 1850-1913," LEM Papers Series 2014/23, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssa:lemwps:2014/23
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N73 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy

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