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Research Quality and Gender Gap in Research Assessment

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Abstract

The literature on the gender gap in science reveals differences in wages, productivity, access to funding and impact on the scientific community that disadvantage women. This paper contributes to work on the gender gap in science by investigating issues such as the presence of differences in research quality between genders, the effect of family responsibilities on research quality, differences in collaborations and international co-authorships, the effect of evaluation methodology, i.e. whether bibliometric evaluation disadvantages women, and the presence of discrimination defined by referees’ gender. We use the data from the National Research Assessment (VQR 2004-2010) conducted by the Italian Agency for the Evaluation of Universities and Research Institutes. These rich data allow us to control for individual variables, research output characteristics and university and scientific sector fixed effects. We find that gender differences in research quality are reduced if we control for researchers' observable characteristics, evaluation method, and referees. In particular, we find that maternity and the intensity of research collaborations and international co-authorships play no role in explaining research quality differences. Further analysis of a random sample of papers evaluated using bibliometric indicators and peer review reveals that bibliometric evaluation does not penalize women with respect to men.

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  • Tullio Jappelli & Carmela Anna Nappi & Roberto Torrini, 2015. "Research Quality and Gender Gap in Research Assessment," CSEF Working Papers 418, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:sef:csefwp:418
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    File URL: http://www.csef.it/WP/wp418.pdf
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    1. Lex Borghans & Bart H. H. Golsteyn & James J. Heckman & Huub Meijers, 2009. "Gender Differences in Risk Aversion and Ambiguity Aversion," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(2-3), pages 649-658, 04-05.
    2. repec:eee:jeborg:v:140:y:2017:i:c:p:147-175 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Krapf, Matthias & Ursprung, Heinrich W. & Zimmermann, Christian, 2017. "Parenthood and productivity of highly skilled labor: Evidence from the groves of academe," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 147-175.
    4. Natalia Zinovyeva & Manuel F. Bagues, 2010. "Does gender matter for academic promotion? Evidence from a randomized natural experiment," Working Papers 2010-15, FEDEA.
    5. Brooks, Chris & Fenton, Evelyn M. & Walker, James T., 2014. "Gender and the evaluation of research," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(6), pages 990-1001.
    6. Muriel Niederle & Lise Vesterlund, 2007. "Do Women Shy Away From Competition? Do Men Compete Too Much?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 1067-1101.
    7. Lex Borghans & Bart H.H. Golsteyn & James J. Heckman & Huub Meijers, 2009. "Gender Differences in Risk Aversion and Ambiguity," Working Papers 200903, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    8. Manuel Bagues & Mauro Sylos-Labini & Natalia Zinovyeva, 2014. "Do gender quotas pass the test ? Evidence from academic evaluations in Italy," LEM Papers Series 2014/14, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maria De Paola & Michela Ponzo & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2016. "Are Men Given Priority for Top Jobs? Investigating the Glass Ceiling in the Italian Academia," CSEF Working Papers 428, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.

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    Keywords

    household saving; household debt; financial fragility; pension reforms;

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