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Labor Migration from East to West in the Context of European Integration and Changing Socio-political Borders

  • Xavier Chojnicki
  • Ainura Uzagalieva

Labor migration from Eastern Europe and the member countries of Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) to the Western countries became an important socio-economic issue. Since political systems and the nature of border management in these regions, migrations turned out to be a very complex and unpredictable issue. The purpose of this study is to analyze the region specific actors, practices and policies of migration in the Eastern countries, the possible scenarios and demographic consequences of the future migration flows. In order to address this issue properly, some of the complexities of labor migration phenomenon in the region are uncovered.

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Paper provided by CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research in its series CASE Network Studies and Analyses with number 0366.

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Length: 33 Pages
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:sec:cnstan:0366
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  10. Ali Mansoor & Bryce Quillin, 2007. "Migration and Remittances : Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6920, September.
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