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New Keynesian models with labor market rigidities: a critical survey

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  • Marianna Riggi

Abstract

The labor market is receiving increasing attention in the New Keynesian literature. In this paper I critically survey this literature in order to highlight the role played by wage rigidities in the explanation of fluctuations caused by technology shocks. To this aim, I present a DSGE model with sticky prices, nominal wage rigidities, and hiring costs. The comparison between this model and Blanchard and Gali (2006) highlights the non trivial differences which exist in the way nominal wage and real wage rigidities drive the economy’s dynamics. My conclusion is that models incorporating nominal wage rigidities and some degree of price stickiness provide a better account of macroeconomic dynamics than models with real wage rigidities.

Suggested Citation

  • Marianna Riggi, 2007. "New Keynesian models with labor market rigidities: a critical survey," Working Papers 102, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sap:wpaper:wp102
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Faia, Ester, 2008. "Optimal monetary policy rules with labor market frictions," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1600-1621, May.
    2. Vincent Bodart & Gregory de Walque & Olivier Pierrard & Henri R. Sneessens & Raf Wouters, 2006. "Nominal wage rigidities in a new Keynesian model with frictional unemployment," Working Paper Research 97, National Bank of Belgium.
    3. Carlsson, Mikael & Westermark, Andreas, 2006. "Monetary Policy and Staggered Wage Bargaining when Prices are Sticky," Working Paper Series 2006:31, Uppsala University, Department of Economics, revised 05 Jun 2009.
    4. Kevin Huang & Z. Liu, "undated". "Staggered contracts and business cycle persistence," Working Papers 2000-08, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
    5. Krause, Michael U. & Lubik, Thomas A., 2007. "The (ir)relevance of real wage rigidity in the New Keynesian model with search frictions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 706-727, April.
    6. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 1999. "Monetary policy and asset price volatility," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 77-128.
    7. Guerrieri, Luca, 2006. "The Inflation Persistence of Staggered Contracts," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(2), pages 483-494, March.
    8. Steinsson, Jon, 2003. "Optimal monetary policy in an economy with inflation persistence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(7), pages 1425-1456, October.
    9. Jeanne, Olivier, 1998. "Generating real persistent effects of monetary shocks: How much nominal rigidity do we really need?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 1009-1032, June.
    10. Galí, Jordi & Rabanal, Pau, 2004. "Technology Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations: How Well Does the RBC Model Fit Post-War US Data?," CEPR Discussion Papers 4522, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Christoffel, Kai & Linzert, Tobias, 2005. "The Role of Real Wage Rigidity and Labor Market Frictions for Unemployment and Inflation Dynamics," IZA Discussion Papers 1896, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Michael T. Kiley, 1997. "Staggered price setting and real rigidities," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1997-46, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    13. Zheng Liu & Louis Phaneuf, 2004. "What Explains the Effects of Technology Shocks on Labor Market Dynamics?," Emory Economics 0414, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
    14. Robert E. Hall, 2005. "Employment Fluctuations with Equilibrium Wage Stickiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 50-65, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    new Keynesian model; labor market frictions; real wage rigidities; nominal wage rigidities; technology shock; employment.;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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