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Judicial Lobbying: The Politics of Labor Law, Constitutional Interpretation. Argentina 1935-1998

Author

Listed:
  • Mariano Tommasi

    () (Department of Economics, Universidad de San Andres & Center of Studies for Institutional Development)

  • Matias Iaryczower

    (University of California at Los Angeles)

  • Pablo T. Spiller

    (Haas School of Business, UC-Berkeley)

Abstract

This paper links the theory of interest groups influence over the legislature with that of congressional control over the judiciary. We develop a model in which (i) Court’s rulings can be reversed by Congress, and (ii) an Interest Group is privately informed about the realization of a variable affecting legislators’ preferences. Lobbying by the Interest Group can be informative to legislators provided equilibrium policy is responsive to the information disclosed. Since the rulings of an unconstrained court are unaffected by the state of nature, this can only happen if the Court is constrained by Congress. As a result, while the pro-interest group tendency of judicial decisions increases with the level of lobbying, lobbying falls the more divided Congress is on the relevant issues. We apply this framework to Supreme Court labor decisions in Argentina, and find results consistent with the predictions of the theory.

Suggested Citation

  • Mariano Tommasi & Matias Iaryczower & Pablo T. Spiller, 2004. "Judicial Lobbying: The Politics of Labor Law, Constitutional Interpretation. Argentina 1935-1998," Working Papers 73, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Jun 2004.
  • Handle: RePEc:sad:wpaper:73
    as

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    File URL: ftp://webacademicos.udesa.edu.ar/pub/econ/doc73.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Keywords

    judicial; lobby; labor law; constitutions; Argentina;

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