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Estimating Bulgaria's Trade Borders with the EU An Application of the Empirical Gravity Model of Trade

Listed author(s):
  • Iliev, Dragomir

    ()

    (Tsenov Academy of Economics)

  • Stefanov, Galin

    ()

    (Tsenov Academy of Economics)

  • Yotov, Yoto

    ()

    (School of Economics)

We use the empirical gravity model of international trade to evaluate the borders in manufacturing trade between Bulgaria and the European Union (BG-EU). Our results suggest that in 2006 the BG-EU border was quite large and not statistically different from the average border in our sample of 69 countries. As expected, our estimates confirm that the trade border between Bulgaria and the EU members was very large, and much larger than the average sample border, before the collapse of communism. The border fell sharply in the early to mid-90s, but it followed the average sample trend since then. We also document weak asymmetries in the BG-EU border in favor of EU exports to Bulgaria. Our results point to a series of extensions and further analysis.

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Paper provided by LeBow College of Business, Drexel University in its series School of Economics Working Paper Series with number 2017-2.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: 16 Jan 2017
Handle: RePEc:ris:drxlwp:2017_002
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.lebow.drexel.edu/

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  1. Baldwin, Richard & Taglioni, Daria, 2006. "Gravity for Dummies and Dummies for Gravity Equations," CEPR Discussion Papers 5850, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Piermartini, Roberta & Yotov, Yoto, 2016. "Estimating Trade Policy Effects with Structural Gravity," School of Economics Working Paper Series 2016-10, LeBow College of Business, Drexel University.
  3. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 170-192, March.
  4. Head, Keith & Mayer, Thierry, 2014. "Gravity Equations: Workhorse,Toolkit, and Cookbook," Handbook of International Economics, Elsevier.
  5. Mario Larch & Yoto V. Yotov, 2016. "General Equilibrium Trade Policy Analysis with Structural Gravity," CESifo Working Paper Series 6020, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. James E. Anderson & Mario Larch & Yoto V. Yotov, 2015. "Estimating General Equilibrium Trade Policy Effects: GE PPML," CESifo Working Paper Series 5592, CESifo Group Munich.
  7. Mayer, Thierry & Zignago, Soledad, 2006. "Notes on CEPII’s distances measures," MPRA Paper 26469, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. James E. Anderson & Yoto V. Yotov, 2010. "The Changing Incidence of Geography," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2157-2186, December.
  9. I-Hui Cheng & Howard J. Wall, 2005. "Controlling for heterogeneity in gravity models of trade and integration," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 49-63.
  10. Rahel Aichele & Gabriel Felbermayr & Inga Heiland, 2014. "Going Deep: The Trade and Welfare Effects of TTIP," CESifo Working Paper Series 5150, CESifo Group Munich.
  11. Costinot, Arnaud & Rodríguez-Clare, Andrés, 2014. "Trade Theory with Numbers: Quantifying the Consequences of Globalization," Handbook of International Economics, Elsevier.
  12. Rikhil Bhavnani & Natalia T. Tamirisa & Arvind Subramanian & David T. Coe, 2002. "The Missing Globalization Puzzle," IMF Working Papers 02/171, International Monetary Fund.
  13. Anne-Célia Disdier & Keith Head, 2008. "The Puzzling Persistence of the Distance Effect on Bilateral Trade," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(1), pages 37-48, February.
  14. Jonathan Eaton & Samuel Kortum, 2002. "Technology, Geography, and Trade," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(5), pages 1741-1779, September.
  15. Anderson, James E, 1979. "A Theoretical Foundation for the Gravity Equation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(1), pages 106-116, March.
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