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Informational Mobility and Productivity - Finnish Evidence

Author

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  • Maliranta, Mika
  • Rouvinen, Petri

Abstract

The labor productivity effects of portability and connectivity of information and communication technology (ICT) are studied with Finnish firm-level data. It is found that a computer with only processing and storage capabilities boosts labor productivity by 9% (corresponding to 5% output elasticity), portability by 32%, wireline connectivity by 14%, and wireless connectivity by 6%. The findings are in line with previous literature and comparisons to ICT costs suggest that firms equate marginal costs and returns. Although increasing ICT penetration can no longer be a major source of productivity growth in developed economies, the relatively new characteristics studied can.
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Suggested Citation

  • Maliranta, Mika & Rouvinen, Petri, 2004. "Informational Mobility and Productivity - Finnish Evidence," Discussion Papers 919, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  • Handle: RePEc:rif:dpaper:919
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nathalie Greenana & Jacques Mairesse, 2000. "Computers And Productivity In France: Some Evidence," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(3), pages 275-315.
    2. Dearden, Lorraine & Reed, Howard & Van Reenen, John, 2000. "Who Gains when Workers Train? Training and Corporate Productivity in a Panel of British Industries," CEPR Discussion Papers 2486, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    4. Pekka Ilmakunnas & Mika Maliranta, 2005. "Technology, Labour Characteristics and Wage-productivity Gaps," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 67(5), pages 623-645, October.
    5. John E. DiNardo & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 1997. "The Returns to Computer Use Revisited: Have Pencils Changed the Wage Structure Too?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 291-303.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Arthur Grimes & Cleo Ren & Philip Stevens, 2012. "The need for speed: impacts of internet connectivity on firm productivity," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 187-201, April.
    2. Heli Koski & Mika Pajarinen, 2015. "Subsidies, the Shadow of Death and Labor Productivity," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 189-204, June.
    3. Hyvärinen, Jari, 2012. "Productivity: An International Comparison," Discussion Papers 1264, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    4. Pawlak, Jacek & Polak, John W. & Sivakumar, Aruna, 2015. "Towards a microeconomic framework for modelling the joint choice of activity–travel behaviour and ICT use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 92-112.
    5. Martikainen, Olli & Autere, Jussi & Nurmela, Markku, 2006. "Performance Improvement in Public Organizations, How to Leverage ICT Investments," Discussion Papers 1022, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    productivity; computer; ICT; information and communication technology; LAN; local area network; mobility; portability; wireless;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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