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The Political Economy of Large-Scale Agricultural Land Acquisitions: Implications for Food Security and Livelihoods/Employment Creation in Rural Mozambique

  • Ellen Aabø

    (United Nations Development Program, Maputo, Mozambique)

  • Thomas Kring


    (United Nations Development Program, Maputo, Mozambique)

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    This paper will provide a brief assessment of the impacts of investments on food security and rural livelihoods/ employment creation in Mozambique. Based on the lessons learned from the Mozambican experience the paper will discuss the potential role of large-scale land acquisitions in promoting food security and reducing poverty. The paper will also discuss some of the opportunity costs associated with large-scale farming and look at the alternative rural development strategies available to Mozambique, as well as other land-abundant African countries. The paper concludes that, despite some recorded positive impacts, the relatively high number of negative impacts from recent large-scale land acquisitions in Mozambique give cause for concern. The country`s demographic and sociopolitical characteristics suggest that a laborintensive rural development strategy may be more suitable than the attraction of large-scale investments in farmland.

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    Paper provided by United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa in its series UNDP Africa Policy Notes with number 2012-004.

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    Length: 63 pages
    Date of creation: Jan 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:rac:wpaper:2012-004
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    1. Juma, Calestous, 2011. "The New Harvest: Agricultural Innovation in Africa," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199783199, July.
    2. Schut, Marc & Slingerland, Maja & Locke, Anna, 2010. "Biofuel developments in Mozambique. Update and analysis of policy, potential and reality," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 5151-5165, September.
    3. Arndt, Channing & Benfica, Rui M.S. & Thurlow, James, 2012. "Gender Implications of Biofuels Expansion in Africa: The Case of Mozambique," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 125395, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Fan, S., 2008. "Investing in african agriculture to halve poverty by 2015," IWMI Working Papers H041613, International Water Management Institute.
    5. Eastwood, Robert & Lipton, Michael & Newell, Andrew, 2010. "Farm Size," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, Elsevier.
    6. Channing Arndt & Andres Garcia & Finn Tarp & James Thurlow, 2012. "Poverty Reduction and Economic Structure: Comparative Path Analysis for Mozambique and Vietnam," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 58(4), pages 742-763, December.
    7. Uaiene, Rafael N. & Arndt, Channing, 2009. "Farm Household Efficiency In Mozambique," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51438, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
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