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Teenagers' expectations of applying to university: how do they change?

Author

Listed:
  • Jake Anders

    () (Department of Quantitative Social Science, Institute of Education, University of London)

  • John Micklewright

    () (Department of Quantitative Social Science, Institute of Education, University of London)

Abstract

We show how young people's expectations about application to university change during the teenage years, drawing on the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE). We reveal the pattern of change by family background (measured by parental education and family income), prior attainment at the end of primary school (measured by Key Stage 2 tests) and, critically, the combination of the two. We document the relationship between expectations about university application and the decision on whether to stay on in full-time education at 16. We point to the importance of schools in sustaining or changing expectations. We relate the expectations reported by the teenagers in LSYPE to their actual university application decisions by age 20 or 21. Expectations are high but not universally high. Family background gaps in expectations widen during the teenage years.

Suggested Citation

  • Jake Anders & John Micklewright, 2013. "Teenagers' expectations of applying to university: how do they change?," DoQSS Working Papers 13-13, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:qss:dqsswp:1313
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    File URL: http://repec.ioe.ac.uk/REPEc/pdf/qsswp1313.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Haroon Chowdry & Claire Crawford & Lorraine Dearden & Alissa Goodman & Anna Vignoles, 2013. "Widening participation in higher education: analysis using linked administrative data," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 176(2), pages 431-457, February.
    2. Jake Anders, 2012. "Using the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England for research into Higher Education access," DoQSS Working Papers 12-13, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    3. Jake Anders, 2012. "The Link between Household Income, University Applications and University Attendance," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 33(2), pages 185-210, June.
    4. Marcello Sartarelli, 2011. "Do Performance Targets Affect Behaviour? Evidence from Discontinuities in Test Scores in England," DoQSS Working Papers 11-02, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    5. John Jerrim, 2011. "Disadvantaged children’s ``low'' educational expectations: Are the US and UK really so different to other industrialized nations?," DoQSS Working Papers 11-04, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:reihed:v:58:y:2017:i:7:d:10.1007_s11162-017-9446-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Marina Della Giusta & Sarah Jewell & Danica Vukadinovic Greetham, 2017. "Beliefs, Exams and Social Media: A Study of Girls and Boys in the UK," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2017-02, Henley Business School, Reading University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    expectations; university application; family background; LSYPE;

    JEL classification:

    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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