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Using the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England for research into Higher Education access

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  • Jake Anders

    () (Institute of Education, University of London)

Abstract

The Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE) has the potential to be an important new resource for addressing research questions regarding access to Higher Education. This paper outlines the data available in the LSYPE and assesses its quality, particularly relative to other datasets that have been used to address similar questions in the past. The paper finds many positive features of the data. These include data collection from parents (including much information on family background characteristics) and good family income measurement compared with many previous studies. The LSYPE also measures a greater depth of HE-related outcomes than some previous datasets, including application, entry, subject studied and institution attended. However, comparison with official statistics suggests that this may be undermined by a large overestimation of the proportion of young people who enter Higher Education (as much as ten percentage points) than we would see in a truly nationally representative sample. There is also some evidence of underreporting of family income. Nevertheless, the paper concludes that analysis of the LSYPE has the potential to shed new light on university access in England.

Suggested Citation

  • Jake Anders, 2012. "Using the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England for research into Higher Education access," DoQSS Working Papers 12-13, Quantitative Social Science - UCL Social Research Institute, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:qss:dqsswp:1213
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    File URL: https://repec.ucl.ac.uk/REPEc/pdf/qsswp1213.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Jake Anders & John Micklewright, 2013. "Teenagers' expectations of applying to university: how do they change?," DoQSS Working Papers 13-13, Quantitative Social Science - UCL Social Research Institute, University College London.
    2. Jake Anders, 2014. "Does an aptitude test affect socioeconomic and gender gaps in attendance at an elite university?," DoQSS Working Papers 14-07, Quantitative Social Science - UCL Social Research Institute, University College London.
    3. Emma Gorman & Colm Harmon & Silvia Mendolia & Anita Staneva & Ian Walker, 2019. "The Causal Effects of Adolescent School Bullying Victimisation on Later Life Outcomes," Working Papers 2019-019, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    4. Jake Anders, 2012. "What's the link between household income and going to university?," DoQSS Working Papers 12-01, Quantitative Social Science - UCL Social Research Institute, University College London.
    5. Buchmueller, Gerda & Walker, Ian, 2020. "The Graduate Wage and Earnings Premia and the Role of Non-Cognitive Skills," IZA Discussion Papers 13248, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Daniel Gladwell & Gurleen Popli & Aki Tsuchiya, 2015. "A Dynamic Analysis of Skill Formation and NEET status," Working Papers 2015016, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    7. Benjamin Alcott, 2017. "Does Teacher Encouragement Influence Students’ Educational Progress? A Propensity-Score Matching Analysis," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 58(7), pages 773-804, November.
    8. Emma Gorman & Colm Harmon & Silvia Mendolia & Anita Staneva & Ian Walker, 2020. "Adolescent School Bullying Victimisation and Later Life Outcomes," CEPEO Working Paper Series 20-05, Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities, UCL Institute of Education, revised Feb 2020.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    : Higher Education; Socioeconomic Gradient; Intergenerational Mobility; Longitudinal Research; Survey Data.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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