IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/68185.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Wind speed and electricity demand correlation analysis in the Australian National Electricity Market: Determining wind turbine generators’ ability to meet electricity demand without energy storage

Author

Listed:
  • Bell, William Paul
  • Wild, Phillip
  • Foster, John
  • Michael, Hewson

Abstract

This paper analyses wind speed and electricity demand correlation to determine the ability of wind turbine generators to meet electricity demand in the Australian National Electricity Market (NEM) without the aid of energy storage. With the proposed increases in the number of windfarms to meet the Large-scale Renewable Energy Target (LRET), this correlation study is formative to identifying price and power stability issues and determining what transmission structure is required to best facilitate the absorption of wind power. We calculate correlations between wind speed and electricity demand data for the years 2010 to 2012 using Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF 2015) wind speed data and Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) electricity demand data. We calculate state level correlations to identify potential bottlenecks in the interconnectors that link each state’s transmission network. The transmission lines within each state tend to be less of a constraint. We find a small temporal increase in correlation between electricity demand and wind speed. This we attribute to an unwitting renewable energy portfolio effect with the increase in solar PV and solar water heating. Strengthening this portfolio effect is the decline in manufacturing that makes household domestic demand relatively larger. Comparing our study with an earlier correlation analysis by Bannister and Wallace (2011) tends to confirm our initial findings. We find the most advantage from the lack of correlation between wind speed between the NEM’s peripheral states including Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania. Additionally, the correlation between electricity demand and wind speed is strongest between these states. Similarly, we find the most advantage from the lack of correlation between electricity demand in each of these states. The self-interest groups within Victoria and New South Wales and the transmission companies geographically contained within each state hinders the development of optimal interconnector capacity to maximise the benefit of wind power in the peripheral states and the NEM generally.

Suggested Citation

  • Bell, William Paul & Wild, Phillip & Foster, John & Michael, Hewson, 2015. "Wind speed and electricity demand correlation analysis in the Australian National Electricity Market: Determining wind turbine generators’ ability to meet electricity demand without energy storage," MPRA Paper 68185, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:68185
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/68185/2/MPRA_paper_68185.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bell, William Paul & Wild, Phillip & Foster, John, 2013. "The transformative effect of unscheduled generation by solar PV and wind generation on net electricity demand," MPRA Paper 46065, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Woo, C.K. & Horowitz, I. & Moore, J. & Pacheco, A., 2011. "The impact of wind generation on the electricity spot-market price level and variance: The Texas experience," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 3939-3944, July.
    3. Cutler, Nicholas J. & Boerema, Nicholas D. & MacGill, Iain F. & Outhred, Hugh R., 2011. "High penetration wind generation impacts on spot prices in the Australian national electricity market," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 5939-5949, October.
    4. Elliston, Ben & MacGill, Iain & Diesendorf, Mark, 2013. "Least cost 100% renewable electricity scenarios in the Australian National Electricity Market," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 270-282.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ian M. Trotter & Torjus F. Bolkesj{o} & Eirik O. J{aa}stad & Jon Gustav Kirkerud, 2021. "Increased Electrification of Heating and Weather Risk in the Nordic Power System," Papers 2112.02893, arXiv.org.
    2. William Paul Bell & John Foster, 2017. "Using solar PV feed-in tariff policy history to inform a sustainable flexible pricing regime to enhance the diffusion of energy storage and electric vehicles," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 127-145, April.
    3. Bell, William Paul & Wild, Phillip & Foster, John & Hewson, Michael, 2017. "Revitalising the wind power induced merit order effect to reduce wholesale and retail electricity prices in Australia," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 224-241.
    4. Falbo, Paolo & Ruiz, Carlos, 2019. "Optimal sales-mix and generation plan in a two-stage electricity market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 598-614.
    5. Paul Simshauser & Joel Gilmore, 2020. "Is the NEM broken? Policy discontinuity and the 2017-2020 investment megacycle," Working Papers EPRG2014, Energy Policy Research Group, Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge.
    6. Simshauser, P., 2019. "On the impact of government-initiated CfD’s in Australia’s National Electricity Market," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1901, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    7. Simshauser, Paul, 2019. "Missing money, missing policy and Resource Adequacy in Australia's National Electricity Market," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 1-1.
    8. Paolo Falbo & Carlos Ruiz, 2021. "Joint optimization of sales-mix and generation plan for a large electricity producer," Papers 2110.02016, arXiv.org.
    9. Simshauser, Paul, 2018. "Garbage can theory and Australia's National Electricity Market: Decarbonisation in a hostile policy environment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 697-713.
    10. Rai, Alan & Nunn, Oliver, 2020. "On the impact of increasing penetration of variable renewables on electricity spot price extremes in Australia," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 67-86.
    11. Simshauser, Paul, 2020. "Merchant renewables and the valuation of peaking plant in energy-only markets," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C).
    12. Nelson, Tim & Rai, Alan & Esplin, Ryan, 2021. "Overcoming the limitations of variable renewable production subsidies as a means of decarbonising electricity markets," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 544-556.
    13. Jiang, Ping & Li, Ranran & Liu, Ningning & Gao, Yuyang, 2020. "A novel composite electricity demand forecasting framework by data processing and optimized support vector machine," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 260(C).
    14. Álvaro García-Cerezo & Luis Baringo & Raquel García-Bertrand, 2020. "Representative Days for Expansion Decisions in Power Systems," Energies, MDPI, vol. 13(2), pages 1-18, January.
    15. Unger, Elizabeth A. & Ulfarsson, Gudmundur F. & Gardarsson, Sigurdur M. & Matthiasson, Thorolfur, 2018. "The effect of wind energy production on cross-border electricity pricing: The case of western Denmark in the Nord Pool market," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 121-130.
    16. Paul Simshauser, 2019. "On the Stability of Energy-Only Markets with Government-Initiated Contracts-for-Differences," Energies, MDPI, vol. 12(13), pages 1-24, July.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Csereklyei, Zsuzsanna & Qu, Songze & Ancev, Tihomir, 2019. "The effect of wind and solar power generation on wholesale electricity prices in Australia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 358-369.
    2. Elberg, Christina & Hagspiel, Simeon, 2015. "Spatial dependencies of wind power and interrelations with spot price dynamics," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 241(1), pages 260-272.
    3. Würzburg, Klaas & Labandeira, Xavier & Linares, Pedro, 2013. "Renewable generation and electricity prices: Taking stock and new evidence for Germany and Austria," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(S1), pages 159-171.
    4. William Paul Bell & John Foster, 2017. "Using solar PV feed-in tariff policy history to inform a sustainable flexible pricing regime to enhance the diffusion of energy storage and electric vehicles," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 127-145, April.
    5. Cao, K.H. & Qi, H.S. & Tsai, C.H. & Woo, C.K. & Zarnikau, J., 2021. "Energy trading efficiency in the US Midcontinent electricity markets," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 302(C).
    6. Bahramian, Pejman & Jenkins, Glenn P. & Milne, Frank, 2021. "The displacement impacts of wind power electricity generation: Costly lessons from Ontario," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 152(C).
    7. Pérez Odeh, Rodrigo & Watts, David & Negrete-Pincetic, Matías, 2018. "Portfolio applications in electricity markets review: Private investor and manager perspective trends," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 81(P1), pages 192-204.
    8. Woo, C.K. & Chen, Y. & Olson, A. & Moore, J. & Schlag, N. & Ong, A. & Ho, T., 2017. "Electricity price behavior and carbon trading: New evidence from California," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 204(C), pages 531-543.
    9. Zarnikau, J. & Tsai, C.H. & Woo, C.K., 2020. "Determinants of the wholesale prices of energy and ancillary services in the U.S. Midcontinent electricity market," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 195(C).
    10. Suomalainen, Kiti & Pritchard, Geoffrey & Sharp, Basil & Yuan, Ziqi & Zakeri, Golbon, 2015. "Correlation analysis on wind and hydro resources with electricity demand and prices in New Zealand," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 445-462.
    11. Woo, C.K. & Ho, T. & Zarnikau, J. & Olson, A. & Jones, R. & Chait, M. & Horowitz, I. & Wang, J., 2014. "Electricity-market price and nuclear power plant shutdown: Evidence from California," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 234-244.
    12. Sreedharan, P. & Farbes, J. & Cutter, E. & Woo, C.K. & Wang, J., 2016. "Microgrid and renewable generation integration: University of California, San Diego," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 169(C), pages 709-720.
    13. Zafirakis, Dimitrios & Chalvatzis, Konstantinos J. & Baiocchi, Giovanni & Daskalakis, George, 2013. "Modeling of financial incentives for investments in energy storage systems that promote the large-scale integration of wind energy," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 138-154.
    14. Jenny Riesz, Joel Gilmore, Iain MacGill, 2016. "Assessing the viability of Energy-Only Markets with 100% Renewables," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1).
    15. Elberg, Christina & Hagspiel, Simeon, 2013. "Spatial Dependencies of Wind Power and Interrelations with Spot Price Dynamics," EWI Working Papers 2013-11, Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln (EWI).
    16. Azofra, D. & Martínez, E. & Jiménez, E. & Blanco, J. & Azofra, F. & Saenz-Díez, J.C., 2015. "Comparison of the influence of photovoltaic and wind power on the Spanish electricity prices by means of artificial intelligence techinques," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 532-542.
    17. Zarnikau, J. & Zhu, S. & Woo, C.K. & Tsai, C.H., 2020. "Texas's operating reserve demand curve's generation investment incentive," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 137(C).
    18. Zarnikau, J. & Woo, C.K. & Zhu, S. & Tsai, C.H., 2019. "Market price behavior of wholesale electricity products: Texas," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 418-428.
    19. Forrest, Sam & MacGill, Iain, 2013. "Assessing the impact of wind generation on wholesale prices and generator dispatch in the Australian National Electricity Market," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 120-132.
    20. Woo, C.K. & Moore, J. & Schneiderman, B. & Ho, T. & Olson, A. & Alagappan, L. & Chawla, K. & Toyama, N. & Zarnikau, J., 2016. "Merit-order effects of renewable energy and price divergence in California’s day-ahead and real-time electricity markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 299-312.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wind speed Electricity demand Correlation Australian National Electricity Market Wind turbine generators Renewable energy Renewable energy portfolio solar PV;

    JEL classification:

    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q47 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy Forecasting
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:68185. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Joachim Winter (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.