IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/67093.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Donor’s double talk undermines African agency: Comparative study of civic agency in Burkina Faso and Togo

Author

Listed:
  • Kohnert, Dirk

Abstract

Despite a long-standing controversy about aid-effectiveness in general and the impact of aid-dependency on governance in particular, little is known on the effect of donors policies on civic agency for democratization in aid dependent autocratic regimes. In this study it is argued that the long-term effects of double-talk of donors, who openly promote democracy and freedom but covertly follow overriding hidden interest, are a neglected source of failure of civic protest and democratic revolutions in autocratic regimes. The differing outcome of ‘democratic revolutions’ in Togo and Burkina Faso – both ‘aid darlings’ for decades - serves to substantiate this thesis. A systematic and holistic consideration is necessary for an unbiased evaluation of the hidden adverse impact of aid on collective action at the grass-roots. Therefore, a rethinking of temporal and disciplinary ‘fault lines’ in development politics as well as in development studies is essential.

Suggested Citation

  • Kohnert, Dirk, 2015. "Donor’s double talk undermines African agency: Comparative study of civic agency in Burkina Faso and Togo," MPRA Paper 67093, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:67093
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/67093/1/MPRA_paper_67093.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/68292/8/MPRA_paper_68292.pdf
    File Function: revised version
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kohnert, Dirk & Elwert, Georg & Bierschenk, Thomas, 1993. "The long-term effects of development aid - Empirical studies in rural West Africa," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 83-111.
    2. Kohnert, Dirk, 2004. "Country Concepts and the Rational Actor Trap - Limitations to Strategic Management of International NGOs," EconStor Conference Papers 118632, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    3. Thierry Kangoye, 2013. "Does aid unpredictability weaken governance? Evidence from developing countries," Post-Print halshs-00843755, HAL.
    4. Bigsten, Arne & Tengstam, Sven, 2015. "International Coordination and the Effectiveness of Aid," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 75-85.
    5. Simeon Djankov & Jose Montalvo & Marta Reynal-Querol, 2008. "The curse of aid," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 169-194, September.
    6. Kohnert, Dirk, 2011. "Cultures of Innovation of the African Poor – Common roots, shared traits, joint prospects? On the articulation of multiple modernities in African societies and Black Diasporas in Latin America," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 241-262.
    7. Kohnert, Dirk, 2005. "Die UEMOA und die CFA-Zone: Eine neue Kooperations-Kultur im frankophonen Afrika?," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 115-136.
    8. Thierry Kangoye, 2013. "Does aid unpredictability weaken governance? Evidence from developing countries," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 51(2), pages 121-144, June.
    9. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2012-15 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Nancy Birdsall & Homi Kharas & Ayah Mahgoub & Rita Perakis, 2010. "Quality of Official Development Assistance Assessment," Working Papers id:3228, eSocialSciences.
    11. de Felice, Damiano, 2015. "Diverging Visions on Political Conditionality: The Role of Domestic Politics and International Socialization in French and British Aid," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 26-45.
    12. Dirk Kohnert, 2004. "Election observation in Nigeria & Madagascar: diplomatic vs. technocratic bias," Review of African Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(99), pages 83-101, March.
    13. Resnick, Danielle, 2012. "Foreign Aid in Africa: Tracing Channels of Influence on Democratic Transitions and Consolidation," WIDER Working Paper Series 015, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    14. Hackenesch, Christine, 2015. "It’s Domestic Politics, Stupid! EU Democracy Promotion Strategies Meet African Dominant Party Regimes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 85-96.
    15. Collier, Paul, 2006. "Is Aid Oil? An Analysis Of Whether Africa Can Absorb More Aid," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1482-1497, September.
    16. Bettina Engels, 2015. "Different means of protest, same causes: popular struggles in Burkina Faso," Review of African Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(143), pages 92-106, March.
    17. Thierry Kangoye, 2013. "Does aid unpredictability weaken governance? Evidence from developing countries," Post-Print halshs-00843756, HAL.
    18. Stephen Knack, 2001. "Aid Dependence and the Quality of Governance: Cross-Country Empirical Tests," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 310-329, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Development cooperation; democratization; civic agency; autocratic regimes; Burkina Faso; Togo; West Africa; ODA; aid dependency;

    JEL classification:

    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid
    • F54 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - Colonialism; Imperialism; Postcolonialism
    • F68 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Policy
    • N47 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N97 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Africa; Oceania
    • O21 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Planning Models; Planning Policy
    • O35 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Social Innovation
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:67093. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.