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Policy and Product Differentiations Encourage the International Transfer of Environmental Technologies

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  • Hattori, Keisuke

Abstract

This paper investigates the welfare effects of international transfers of environmental technologies in open economies with international oligopoly and transboundary pollution, and shows that policy differentiation between the donor and recipient countries and/or product differentiation between the donor and recipient firms play a critical role in obtaining a bilateral agreement on the transfer policy between nations. The results arise from the fact that policy differentiation weakens the strategic relationships in environmental policy setting between governments and that product differentiation weakens the strategic relationships in quantity choices between firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Hattori, Keisuke, 2007. "Policy and Product Differentiations Encourage the International Transfer of Environmental Technologies," MPRA Paper 6334, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 20 Sep 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:6334
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/6334/1/MPRA_paper_6334.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hoel, Michael, 1991. "Global environmental problems: The effects of unilateral actions taken by one country," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 55-70, January.
    2. Tae-Yeoun Lee, 2001. "Effects of Technology Transfers on the Provision of Public Goods," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 18(2), pages 193-218, February.
    3. Keisuke Hattori, 2005. "Is Technological Progress Pareto-Improving for a World with Global Public Goods?," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 84(2), pages 135-156, March.
    4. Wolfgang Buchholz & Kai Konrad, 1994. "Global environmental problems and the strategic choice of technology," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 60(3), pages 299-321, October.
    5. John Stranlund, 1996. "On the strategic potential of technological aid in international environmental relations," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 64(1), pages 1-22, February.
    6. Ihori, Toshihiro, 1996. "International public goods and contribution productivity differentials," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 139-154, July.
    7. Kennedy Peter W., 1994. "Equilibrium Pollution Taxes in Open Economies with Imperfect Competition," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 49-63, July.
    8. Rauscher, Michael, 1994. "On Ecological Dumping," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(0), pages 822-840, Supplemen.
    9. Barrett, Scott, 2001. "International cooperation for sale," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(10), pages 1835-1850, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Takeshi Iida & Kenji Takeuchi, 2010. "Environmental Technology Transfer via Free Trade," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(2), pages 948-960.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Technology Transfer; Environmental Tax; Oligopoly;

    JEL classification:

    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies

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