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Human capital and trends in the transmission of economic status across generations in the U.S

Author

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  • Richey, Jeremiah
  • Rosburg, Alicia

Abstract

Using data from the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we investigate the changing roles of ability and education in the transmission of economic status across generations. Potential changes are identified using a decomposition method based on the OLS omitted variable bias formula. We find that ability plays a substantially diminished role for the most recent cohort while education plays a substantially larger role. The first finding results from a smaller effect of children's ability on status and a reduced correlation between parental status and children's ability. The second finding results mainly from increased returns to higher education.

Suggested Citation

  • Richey, Jeremiah & Rosburg, Alicia, 2014. "Human capital and trends in the transmission of economic status across generations in the U.S," MPRA Paper 60113, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:60113
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/60113/1/MPRA_paper_60113.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intergenerational mobility; Education; Ability;

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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