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Culture capital humain et croissance économique
[Culture human capital and economic growth]


  • Jellal, Mohamed


In this paper , we consider an economic growth model with human capital accumulation , positive externalities and a cultural system of social norms . We show that endogenous rational emergence of this cultural belief may lead to increasing the stock of human capital and hence accelerating national growth.The mechanism of this internalization is based on the existence of endogenous social status or identity pattern that encourages the accumulation of knowledge. This cultural norm is presented as an informal mechanism or informal institution which may be an effective substitute tool to a the formal institution given by a system of income taxation.

Suggested Citation

  • Jellal, Mohamed, 2014. "Culture capital humain et croissance économique
    [Culture human capital and economic growth]
    ," MPRA Paper 57267, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:57267

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "Satisfaction and comparison income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 359-381, September.
    2. Weiss, Yoram & Fershtman, Chaim, 1998. "Social status and economic performance:: A survey," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-5), pages 801-820, May.
    3. Fershtman, Chaim & Murphy, Kevin M & Weiss, Yoram, 1996. "Social Status, Education, and Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(1), pages 108-132, February.
    4. Congleton, Roger D., 1989. "Efficient status seeking: Externalities, and the evolution of status games," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 175-190, March.
    5. Corneo, Giacomo & Jeanne, Olivier, 1997. "On relative wealth effects and the optimality of growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 87-92, January.
    6. Piketty, Thomas, 1998. "Self-fulfilling beliefs about social status," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 115-132, October.
    7. Peter J. Klenow & Mark Bils, 2000. "Does Schooling Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1160-1183, December.
    8. Jellal, Mohamed & Bouzahzah, Mohamed, 2012. "Gouvernance éducation et croissance économique
      [Governance education and economic growth]
      ," MPRA Paper 38687, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    More about this item


    Culture; Social Norms; Education; Economic Growth; Formal institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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