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Changes in the Eternal City: Inequalities, commons, and elections in Rome districts from 2000 to 2013

Listed author(s):
  • Tomassi, Federico

In city districts in Rome, social and economic inequalities between centre and peripheral belts have been increasing over the last years, in parallel to the on-going suburban sprawl. Electoral data from 2000 to 2013 highlight sharp political polarization too. Votes for left-wing (right-wing) candidates are directly (inversely) proportional to proximity to Capitoline Hill. Left-wing coalition prevails where social centrality exists, that is in dense districts with widespread social relationships and many public or collective places. Conversely, right-wing parties prevail in far-off sprawled areas, with less opportunities to meet each other, where production and consumption of relational goods are less likely. Since such goods – according to scholars of civil economics – foster individual well-being and local development, they also affect political choices, challenging the so-called traditional ‘red belt’ in working-class districts until the 1980s.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/56227/1/MPRA_paper_56227.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 56227.

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Date of creation: 30 May 2014
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:56227
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  1. Sabatini, Fabio, 2009. "Social capital as social networks: A new framework for measurement and an empirical analysis of its determinants and consequences," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 429-442, June.
  2. Brueckner, Jan K. & Largey, Ann G., 2008. "Social interaction and urban sprawl," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 18-34, July.
  3. Acciari Paolo & Mocetti Sauro, 2012. "The geography of income inequality in Italy," Politica economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 3, pages 307-343.
  4. Di Zio, Simone & Montanari, Armando & Staniscia, Barbara, 2010. "Simulation of urban development in the City of Rome: Framework, methodology, and problem solving," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 3(2), pages 85-105.
  5. Pasquale De Muro & Salvatore Monni & Pasquale Tridico, 2011. "Knowledge‐Based Economy and Social Exclusion: Shadow and Light in the Roman Socio‐Economic Model," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(6), pages 1212-1238, November.
  6. Otto, Alkis Henri & Steinhardt, Max Friedrich, 2014. "Immigration and election outcomes — Evidence from city districts in Hamburg," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 67-79.
  7. Bruni, Luigino & Stanca, Luca, 2008. "Watching alone: Relational goods, television and happiness," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(3-4), pages 506-528, March.
  8. Fabio Sabatini, 2008. "Social Capital and the Quality of Economic Development," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 466-499, 08.
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