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Local Systems’ Strategies Copying with Globalization: Collective Local Entrepreneurship


  • Covi, Giovanni


The paper aims at investigating the possible trajectories of regional clusters (industrial districts or local systems) in order to depict feasible strategies to cope with globalization. First, same relevant stylized facts on the new structure of global market are presented in order to illustrate the new competitive framework the SME must face. Second, the concept of ‘complete productive process’ is introduced to characterize the special setting is necessary for the survival of the regional systems of SME. Said briefly, a local cluster needs to co-produce values, capabilities, institutions: its very identity. Since local systems are essentially ‘cognitive systems’, they need to go global not as single firm but as a system. To accomplish this difficult task they must resort to a collective and cooperative behaviour. The paper tries to fill this gap introducing the concept of ‘Collective Local Entrepreneurship’, a reference point, a device to whom anchor the strategic pragmatism necessary to regional clusters to cope with globalization. The renewal of the local ‘ecosystems’ within the international networks (at all different levels) appears to be a general objective. A strong public-private partnership emerges as a strategic commitment. In this perspective the paper tries to capture, as a conclusion, the potential dynamics of the four evolutionary trajectories, which the regional clusters are called upon to deal with.

Suggested Citation

  • Covi, Giovanni, 2014. "Local Systems’ Strategies Copying with Globalization: Collective Local Entrepreneurship," MPRA Paper 53334, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:53334

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. anonymous, 1995. "Does the bouncing ball lead to economic growth?," Regional Update, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Jul, pages 1-2,4-6.
    2. Robert J. Barro, 2013. "Inflation and Economic Growth," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(1), pages 121-144, May.
    3. Pavitt, Keith, 1984. "Sectoral patterns of technical change: Towards a taxonomy and a theory," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 343-373, December.
    4. Mark Lorenzen, 2001. "Localized Learning and Policy: Academic Advice on Enhancing Regional Competitiveness through Learning," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 163-185, March.
    5. Xavier Sala-I-Martin, 1997. "Transfers, Social Safety Nets, and Economic Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 44(1), pages 81-102, March.
    6. Paul Krugman, 1997. "Development, Geography, and Economic Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026261135x, January.
    7. Dirk Dohse, 2007. "Cluster-Based Technology Policy—The German Experience," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 69-94.
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    1. repec:spr:jknowl:v:8:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s13132-017-0467-z is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    Industrial clusters; innovation; knowledge; industrial policy; entrepreneurship.;

    JEL classification:

    • L22 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Organization and Market Structure
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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