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Capital Flight and Economic Performance

Author

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  • Beja, Edsel Jr.

Abstract

Capital flight aggravates resource constraints and contributes to undermine long-term economic growth. Counterfactual calculations on the Philippines suggest that capital flight contributed to lower the quality of long-term economic growth. Sustained capital flight over three decades means that capital flight had a role for the Philippines to lose the opportunities to achieve economic takeoff. Unless decisive policy actions are taken up to address enduring capital flight and manage the macroeconomy more effectively, the Philippines remains caught in the perpetuity of crises, its economy hollowed-out, the people trapped in poverty, and once again, the country is frustrated from realizing a takeoff.

Suggested Citation

  • Beja, Edsel Jr., 2007. "Capital Flight and Economic Performance," MPRA Paper 4885, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 12 Sep 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:4885
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/4885/1/MPRA_paper_4885.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bowles, Samuel & Gintis, Herbert, 1988. "Contested Exchange: Political Economy and Modern Economic Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 145-150, May.
    2. Beja, Edsel Jr., 2006. "Forensic Accounting: Hidden balance of payments of the Philippines," MPRA Paper 4828, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 12 Sep 2007.
    3. Chang, P H Kevin & Claessens, Stijn & Cumby, Robert E, 1997. "Conceptual and Methodological Issues in the Measurement of Capital Flight," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 2(2), pages 101-119, April.
    4. Imam Alam & Rahim Quazi, 2003. "Determinants of Capital Flight: An econometric case study of Bangladesh," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 85-103.
    5. Niranjan Chipalkatti & Meenakshi Rishi, 2001. "External Debt and Capital Flight in the Indian Economy," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(1), pages 31-44.
    6. Edsel L. Beja, 2006. "Was Capital Fleeing Southeast Asia? Estimates from Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand," Asia Pacific Business Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 261-283, July.
    7. Laura Alfaro & Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Vadym Volosovych, 2008. "Why Doesn't Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries? An Empirical Investigation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(2), pages 347-368, May.
    8. Julio Lopez, 1998. "External Financial Fragility and Capital Flight in Mexico," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 257-270.
    9. Tornell, Aaron & Velasco, Andes, 1992. "The Tragedy of the Commons and Economic Growth: Why Does Capital Flow from Poor to Rich Countries?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(6), pages 1208-1231, December.
    10. Lisa M. Schineller, 1997. "A nonlinear econometric analysis of capital flight," International Finance Discussion Papers 594, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    11. Beja, Edsel Jr., 2006. "Capital Flight and the Hollowing Out of the Philippine Economy in the Neoliberal Regime," MPRA Paper 4830, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Arsenio M. Balisacan, 2007. "Why Does Poverty Persist in the Philippines? Facts, Fancies, and Policies," Agriculture and Development Discussion Paper Series 2007-1, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Samir Abdelhafidh, 2014. "External Debt and Economic Growth in Tunisia," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 61(6), pages 669-689, December.
    2. Beja Jr, Edsel, 2010. "Balance of Payments-consistent unreported flows," MPRA Paper 21699, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:dgr:rugsom:14031-eef is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Hermes, Niels & Lensink, Robert, 2014. "Financial liberalization and capital flight," Research Report 14031-EEF, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Capital flight; economic growth; Philippines;

    JEL classification:

    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • E10 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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