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External Debt and Economic Growth in Tunisia


  • Samir Abdelhafidh

    () (Membre du Laboratoire d’Intégration Économique Internationale, Faculté des Sciences Economiques et de Gestion de Tunis, Université El Manar; École Polytechnique de Tunisie, Université de Carthage, Tunisie)


This paper investigates the external debt effect on economic growth in Tunisia. Our empirical methodology is based on the autoregressive distributed lag approach. We find that in the long- as well as in the short-run, external debt had a negative effect on growth over the 1970-2010 period. The longrun effect was slightly higher in the period before the Ben Ali’s presidency than in the period after. However, during his period, the external debt short-run effect was the double of that observed during the period before. These results suggest that an external debt reduction should favor economic growth in Tunisia.

Suggested Citation

  • Samir Abdelhafidh, 2014. "External Debt and Economic Growth in Tunisia," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 61(6), pages 669-689, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:voj:journl:v:61:y:2014:i:6:p:669-689

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ibrahim Mohammed Adamu & Rajah Rasiah, 2016. "External Debt and Growth Dynamics in Nigeria," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 28(3), pages 291-303, September.

    More about this item


    External debt; Economic growth; ARDL; Tunisia;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa


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