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Brothers in distress: Revolving capital flows of Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand


  • Beja Jr., Edsel L.


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  • Beja Jr., Edsel L., 2007. "Brothers in distress: Revolving capital flows of Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 904-914, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:18:y:2007:i:6:p:904-914

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ethan Kaplan & Dani Rodrik, 2002. "Did the Malaysian Capital Controls Work?," NBER Chapters,in: Preventing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 393-440 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1990. "Why Doesn't Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 92-96, May.
    3. Ndikumana, Leonce & Boyce, James K., 2003. "Public Debts and Private Assets: Explaining Capital Flight from Sub-Saharan African Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 107-130, January.
    4. Demir, Firat, 2004. "A Failure Story: Politics and Financial Liberalization in Turkey, Revisiting the Revolving Door Hypothesis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 851-869, May.
    5. Tornell, Aaron & Velasco, Andes, 1992. "The Tragedy of the Commons and Economic Growth: Why Does Capital Flow from Poor to Rich Countries?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(6), pages 1208-1231, December.
    6. K.S. Jomo & Ilene Grabel & Gerald Epstein, 2003. "Capital Management Techniques In Developing Countries: An Assessment of Experiences From the 1990s and Lessons for the Future," Working Papers wp56, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    7. Boyce, James K., 1992. "The revolving door? External debt and capital flight: A Philippine case study," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 335-349, March.
    8. Niranjan Chipalkatti & Meenakshi Rishi, 2001. "External Debt and Capital Flight in the Indian Economy," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(1), pages 31-44.
    9. Edsel L. Beja, 2006. "Was Capital Fleeing Southeast Asia? Estimates from Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand," Asia Pacific Business Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 261-283, July.
    10. Laura Alfaro & Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Vadym Volosovych, 2008. "Why Doesn't Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries? An Empirical Investigation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(2), pages 347-368, May.
    11. Johnson, Simon & Mitton, Todd, 2003. "Cronyism and capital controls: evidence from Malaysia," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 351-382, February.
    12. Beja, Edsel Jr., 2006. "Capital Flight and the Hollowing Out of the Philippine Economy in the Neoliberal Regime," MPRA Paper 4830, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    1. repec:dgr:rugsom:14031-eef is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Hermes, Niels & Lensink, Robert, 2014. "Financial liberalization and capital flight," Research Report 14031-EEF, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).

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