IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/agd/wpaper/14-016.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

External Debt Origin, Capital Flight and Poverty Reduction in the Franc Zone: Does the Economic Consequences of Sino-African Relationship matter?

Author

Listed:
  • NGUENA Christian-Lambert

    () (Yaoundé/Cameroun)

Abstract

Is China-Africa economic relation instrumental for capital flight and poverty reduction in FZ? Does it matter in the improvement of external debt’s impact on GDP per capita and capital flight reduction in particular? This paper extends and assesses the Asongu and Aminkeng (2013) conclusions about Sino-African economic relations in the FZ context.Thus, practically, the intuition is to use a TSLS-IV econometric estimation technique on 14 African countries specific data over the period 1983-2013 to empirically assess if African external debt exclusively from China can be instrumental in the way toward capital flight and poverty reduction in FZ. The construction of a theoretical framework highlighting stylized fact and the review of a recent literature on this issue has been firstly undertaken. The main result allowed the following interpretations: (a) an important part of the traditional external debt contracted with constraint is going back out of the continent as capital flight and; (b) The capital flight contributes to improving the level of poverty in Africa. Overall, we can conclude that the contribution to economic development depends on the origin of loans received and, fostering the economic relations with China could be an excellent alternative for FZ countries. This paper is original since it has tested the Asongu and Aminkeng (2013) assumption in the continent where concerns of low economic development, higher poverty and capital flight are most acute.

Suggested Citation

  • NGUENA Christian-Lambert, 2014. "External Debt Origin, Capital Flight and Poverty Reduction in the Franc Zone: Does the Economic Consequences of Sino-African Relationship matter?," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 14/016, African Governance and Development Institute..
  • Handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:14/016
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.afridev.org/RePEc/agd/agd-wpaper/External.Debt.Origin.Capital.Flight.and.Poverty.Reduction.in.the.Franc.Zone.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, 2014
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yiping Zhu, 2010. "Trade, capital flows and external balance: is China unique in two hundred years of globalisation?," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 1-22.
    2. Jenkins, Rhys & Edwards, Chris, 2006. "The economic impacts of China and India on sub-Saharan Africa: Trends and prospects," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 207-225, April.
    3. J. K. Boyce & L. Ndikumana, 2001. "Is Africa a Net Creditor? New Estimates of Capital Flight from Severely Indebted Sub-Saharan African Countries, 1970-96," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(2), pages 27-56.
    4. Simplice A. Asongu & Gilbert A.A. Aminkeng, 2013. "The economic consequences of China--Africa relations: debunking myths in the debate," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 261-277, November.
    5. Michael P. Dooley & Kenneth M. Kletzer, 1994. "Capital flight, external debt, and domestic policies," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 29-37.
    6. Christian Lambert Nguena & Roger Tsafack Nanfosso, 2014. "Banking Activity Sensitivity to Macroeconomic Shocks and Financial Policies Implications: The Case of CEMAC Sub-region," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 26(1), pages 102-117, March.
    7. Liming Wang & Jianghai Zheng, 2012. "China's rise as a new paradigm in the world economy: preliminaries," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 301-312, August.
    8. Rian Drogendijk & Katarina Blomkvist, 2013. "Drivers and Motives for Chinese Outward Foreign Direct Investments in Africa," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 75-84, August.
    9. Suhas L Ketkar & Kusum W. Ketkar, 1989. "Determinants Of Capital Flight From Argentina, Brazil, And Mexico," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 7(3), pages 11-29, July.
    10. Christian Lambert Nguena et Roger Tsafack Nanfosso, 2014. "Facteurs Microéconomiques du Déficit de Financement des PME au Cameroun," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 26(2), pages 372-383, June.
    11. Simplice Asongu & John Ssozi, 2016. "Sino-African Relations: Some Solutions and Strategies to the Policy Syndromes," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 33-51, January.
    12. Demery, Lionel & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "Macroeconomic Adjustment and Poverty in Africa: An Emerging Picture," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 11(1), pages 39-59, February.
    13. Michael P. Dooley, 1988. "Capital Flight: A Response to Differences in Financial Risks," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 35(3), pages 422-436, September.
    14. Asongu, Simplice A, 2013. "Fighting African capital flight: timelines for the adoption of common policies," MPRA Paper 48493, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Simplice A. Asongu, 2013. "Investment And Inequality In Africa: Which Financial Channels Are Good For The Poor?," The African Finance Journal, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 15(2), pages 43-65.
    16. Simplice A. Asongu, 2014. "New Financial Development Indicators: With a Critical Contribution to Inequality Empirics," The International Journal of Economic Behavior - IJEB, Faculty of Business and Administration, University of Bucharest, vol. 4(1), pages 33-50.
    17. William X. Wei, 2013. "Special Issue : Chinese Trade and Investment in Africa," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 72-74, August.
    18. Nguena Christian Lambert & Tsafack Nanfosso Roger, 2014. "On the Sensitivity of Banking Activity Shocks: Evidence from the CEMAC Sub-region," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(1), pages 354-372.
    19. Bamidele Adekunle & Ciliaka M. W. Gitau, 2013. "Illusion or Reality: Understanding the Trade Flow Between China and Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 117-126, August.
    20. Jonathan Munemo, 2013. "Examining Imports of Capital Goods From China as a Channel for Technology Transfer and Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 106-116, August.
    21. Boyce, James K., 1992. "The revolving door? External debt and capital flight: A Philippine case study," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 335-349, March.
    22. Simplice A. Asongu, 2014. "Fighting African Capital Flight: Empirics on Benchmarking Policy Harmonization," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 11(1), pages 93-122, June.
    23. Ndikumana, Leonce & Boyce, James K., 2003. "Public Debts and Private Assets: Explaining Capital Flight from Sub-Saharan African Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 107-130, January.
    24. Simplice Asongu, 2014. "Sino-African relations: a review and reconciliation of dominant schools of thought," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 14/037, African Governance and Development Institute..
    25. Asongu, Simplice A, 2014. "A Development Consensus reconciling the Beijing Model and Washington Consensus: Views and Agenda," MPRA Paper 58757, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    26. Nguena, Christian Lambert, 2010. "Rethinking Pro-Growth Monetary Policy in Africa: Monetarist versus Keynesian Approach," MPRA Paper 52100, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 08 Dec 2013.
    27. Baocheng Ji, 2010. "China's economic recovery and the China model," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(3), pages 215-226.
    28. Xiaohua Lin & Carlyle Farrell, 2013. "The Internationalization Strategies of Chinese State and Private Sector Enterprises in Africa," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 85-95, August.
    29. Sanjaya Lall & John Weiss & Hiroshi Oikawa, 2005. "China's Competitive Threat to Latin America: An Analysis for 1990-2002," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 163-194.
    30. Mario Biggeri & Marco Sanfilippo, 2009. "Understanding China's move into Africa: an empirical analysis," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 31-54.
    31. Lalountas, Dionisios A. & Manolas, George A. & Vavouras, Ioannis S., 2011. "Corruption, globalization and development: How are these three phenomena related?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 636-648, July.
    32. Diadié Diaw & Albert Lessoua, 2013. "Natural Resources Exports, Diversification and Economic Growth of CEMAC Countries: On the Impact of Trade with China," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 25(2), pages 189-202.
    33. Diadié Diaw & Albert Lessoua, 2013. "Natural Resources Exports, Diversification and Economic Growth of CEMAC Countries: On the Impact of Trade with China," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 25(2), pages 189-202, June.
    34. Juan Zhang & William X. Wei & Zuanshi Liu, 2013. "Strategic Entry and Determinants of Chinese Private Enterprises Into Africa," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 96-105, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sino-African economic relation; Capital flight; External debt origin; pro poor economic growth; Poverty reduction;

    JEL classification:

    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:14/016. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Asongu Simplice). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/agdiycm.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.