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African trade dynamics: is China a different trading partner?

Author

Listed:
  • Paul De Grauwe
  • Romain Houssa
  • Giulia Piccillo

Abstract

This paper employs the standard gravity model to identify the quality of governance of China's African trade partners. As a benchmark, we perform the same analysis on other major African trade partners: France, Germany, UK, and USA. Data from 53 African countries in 1996--2009 show that only China is consistently willing to import more from African countries with a lower governance standing. By doing so; China fills a gap left open by the other major world economies, and might even play a key role in the future development of Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul De Grauwe & Romain Houssa & Giulia Piccillo, 2012. "African trade dynamics: is China a different trading partner?," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(1), pages 15-45, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jocebs:v:10:y:2012:i:1:p:15-45
    DOI: 10.1080/14765284.2012.638460
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Maurice Obstfeld, 2009. "International Finance and Growth in Developing Countries: What Have We Learned?," NBER Working Papers 14691, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Maurice Obstfeld, 2009. "International Finance and Growth in Developing Countries: What Have We Learned?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 56(1), pages 63-111, April.
    3. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1997. "Regional Trading Blocs in the World Economic System," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 72.
    4. Ndulu,Benno J. & O'Connell,Stephen A. & Bates,Robert H. & Collier,Paul & Soludo,Chukwuma C., 2009. "The Political Economy of Economic Growth in Africa, 1960–2000," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521127752, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Asongu, Simplice & Efobi, Uchenna & Beecroft, Ibukun, 2015. "FDI, Aid, Terrorism: Conditional Threshold Evidence from Developing Countries," EconStor Preprints 114569, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    2. Simplice Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu & Gilbert A. A. Aminkeng, 2014. "China’s Strategies in Economic Diplomacy: A Survey of Updated Lessons for Africa, the West and China," Working Papers 14/036, African Governance and Development Institute..
    3. AKPOILIH, Roland & FARAYIBI, Adesoji, 2015. "Determinants of Nigeria-China Bilateral Trade in Manufacturing Products," MPRA Paper 74183, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Simplice A. Asongu & Gilbert A.A. Aminkeng, 2013. "The economic consequences of China--Africa relations: debunking myths in the debate," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 261-277, November.
    5. Megersa, kelbesa & Cassimon, Danny, 2016. "Debt Sustainability and direction of trade: What does Africa’s shifting engagement with BRIC and OECD tells us?," MPRA Paper 76581, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Asongu, Simplice A, 2014. "Sino-African relations: a review and reconciliation of dominant schools of thought," MPRA Paper 66597, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Asongu, Simplice & Efobi, Uchenna & Beecroft, Ibukun, 2017. "Aid in Modulating the Impact of Terrorism on FDI: No Positive Thresholds, No Policy," MPRA Paper 85488, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Sep 2017.
    8. Salahodjaev, Raufhon & Chepel, Sergey, 2014. "Institutional Quality and Inflation," MPRA Paper 55272, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. repec:fdi:wpaper:1786 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:fdi:wpaper:1785 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Simplice Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu & Gilbert A. A. Aminkeng, 2018. "Lessons from a Survey of China’s Economic Diplomacy," Working Papers 18/009, African Governance and Development Institute..
    12. Simplice Anutechia Asongu, 2014. "A Development Consensus reconciling the Beijing Model and Washington Consensus: Views and Agenda," AAYE Policy Research Working Paper Series 14_025, Association of African Young Economists, revised Dec 2014.
    13. Simplice Asongu & John Ssozi, 2016. "Sino-African Relations: Some Solutions and Strategies to the Policy Syndromes," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 33-51, January.
    14. Omer Gokcekus & Yui Suzuki, 2016. "Mixing Washington Consensus With Beijing Consensus And Corruption In Africa," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(02), pages 1-14, June.
    15. Adolph, Christopher & Quince, Vanessa & Prakash, Aseem, 2017. "The Shanghai Effect: Do Exports to China Affect Labor Practices in Africa?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 1-18.

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