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The biological basis of expected utility anomalies

  • Matsushita, Raul
  • Baldo, Dinorá
  • Martin, Bruna
  • Da Silva, Sergio

We assess the biological basis of expected utility anomalies through an experiment of the Allais paradox. A questionnaire study of 120 subjects replicates the anomalies and further gathers information about the respondents’ bio-characteristics, such as gender, age, parenthood, handedness, second to fourth digit ratio, current emotional state, past negative experiences, and religiousness. We find that some of those bio-characteristics matter for the anomalies.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/4520/1/MPRA_paper_4520.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 4520.

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Date of creation: 17 Aug 2007
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:4520
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