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The Effect of Crime on the Job Market: An ARDL approach to Argentina

  • Cerro, Ana María
  • Rodríguez Andrés, Antonio

This paper provides further evidence on the impact of crime on the job market using the time series data over the period 1980-2007 for Argentina. We also address methodological flaws by earlier crime studies by employing autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) approach to cointegration advocated by Pesaran et al (2001). The results show that unemployment has a statistically positive effect on the crime rate, depending on the model used.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 44457.

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Date of creation: Aug 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:44457
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  1. C. Detotto & M. Pulina, 2009. "Does more crime mean fewer jobs? An ARDL model," Working Paper CRENoS 200905, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
  2. Robert Witt & Alan Clarke & Nigel Fielding, 1998. "Crime, earnings inequality and unemployment in England and Wales," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 265-267.
  3. Entorf, Horst & Spengler, Hannes, 1998. "Socio-economic and demographic factors of crime in Germany: evidence from panel data of the German states," ZEW Discussion Papers 98-16, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  4. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters, in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Karin Edmark, 2005. "Unemployment and Crime: Is There a Connection?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 107(2), pages 353-373, 06.
  6. Lance Lochner & Enrico Moretti, 2004. "The Effect of Education on Crime: Evidence from Prison Inmates, Arrests, and Self-Reports," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 155-189, March.
  7. Dan Usher, 1993. "Education as a Deterrent to Crime," Working Papers 870, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  8. Lochner, L., 1999. "Education, Work, and Crime: Theory and Evidence," RCER Working Papers 465, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  9. repec:oup:qjecon:v:110:y:1995:i:3:p:681-712 is not listed on IDEAS
  10. Mauricio CARDENAS SANTAMARIA, 2002. "Economic growth in Colombia: A reversal of Fortune," ARCHIVOS DE ECONOMÍA 002402, DEPARTAMENTO NACIONAL DE PLANEACIÓN.
  11. Paolo Buonanno & Daniel Montolio & Paolo Vanin, 2006. "Does Social Capital Reduce Crime?," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0029, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
  12. Steven D. Levitt, 1995. "Why Do Increased Arrest Rates Appear to Reduce Crime: Deterrence, Incapacitation, or Measurement Error?," NBER Working Papers 5268, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Paolo Buonanno & Leone Leonida, 2005. "Education and crime: evidence from Italian regions," Working Papers (-2012) 0503, University of Bergamo, Department of Economics.
  14. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
  15. Mauricio Cárdenas, 2007. "Economic growth in Colombia: a reversal of "fortune"?," WORKING PAPERS SERIES. DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 009193, FEDESARROLLO.
  16. Richard B. Freeman, 1994. "Crime and the Job Market," NBER Working Papers 4910, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Rony Pshisva & Gustavo A. Suarez, 2006. "'Captive markets': the impact of kidnappings on corporate investment in Colombia," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2006-18, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  18. Ana María Cerro & Osvaldo Meloni, 2005. "Determinants of the Crime Rate in Argentina during the 90's," Law and Economics 0504001, EconWPA.
  19. Fajnzylber, Pablo & Lederman, Daniel & Loayza, Norman, 2002. "Inequality and Violent Crime," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(1), pages 1-40, April.
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