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Institutions éducation et travail des enfants
[Institutions education and child labor]

Author

Listed:
  • Jellal, Mohamed
  • Tarbalouti, Essaid

Abstract

We presented a theory that attempts to explain the stylized fact of the persistence of child labor in developing countries. Our model shows the importance of the role of institutions in explaining the level of education of these countries. These institutions can be formal as the quality of educational governance or informal social norms as incentives for more education. Our main result showed the existence of a strategic complementarity between the formal institution and informal institution which may create a poverty trap.In particular our theoretical model is a conceptual framework for analyzing our preliminary studies in progress on the determinants of child labor in Morocco.

Suggested Citation

  • Jellal, Mohamed & Tarbalouti, Essaid, 2012. "Institutions éducation et travail des enfants
    [Institutions education and child labor]
    ," MPRA Paper 39384, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39384
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/39384/1/MPRA_paper_39384.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    formal institution; informal institution; social norm; education; child labor;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification
    • K31 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Labor Law
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor

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