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The role of higher education stratification in the reproduction of social inequality in the labour market. A comparative study of recent European graduates

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  • Triventi, Moris

Abstract

This paper analyses the role of institutional stratification within higher education (course length, fields of study and institutional quality) in mediating the relationship between social origin and labour market outcomes (wage and occupational status) in a comparative perspective. In the first part, we develop our theoretical framework, relying on sociological and economic theories and knowledge on countries’ institutional profiles. In the second part, we use data from the 2005 REFLEX survey on European graduates (2000) from 4 countries (Germany, Norway, Italy, and Spain). Results from binomial logistic regression models and the Karlson-Holm-Breen decomposition method indicate that those with tertiary educated parents have higher probabilities of entering in a highly rewarded occupation and this ‘effect’ varies according to level higher education expansion and strength of the institutional mechanisms which connect tertiary education with labour market. Furthermore, higher education stratification contributes to the reproduction on inequality but with a different importance according to the institutional context.

Suggested Citation

  • Triventi, Moris, 2011. "The role of higher education stratification in the reproduction of social inequality in the labour market. A comparative study of recent European graduates," MPRA Paper 35996, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:35996
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/35996/1/MPRA_paper_35996.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard Breen & Kristian Bernt Karlson & Anders Holm, 2013. "Total, Direct, and Indirect Effects in Logit and Probit Models," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 42(2), pages 164-191, May.
    2. Chevalier, Arnaud & Conlon, Gavan, 2003. "Does It Pay to Attend a Prestigious University?," IZA Discussion Papers 848, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Brunello, Giorgio & Cappellari, Lorenzo, 2008. "The labour market effects of Alma Mater: Evidence from Italy," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 564-574, October.
    4. Ulrich Kohler & Kristian Bernt Karlson & Anders Holm, 2011. "Comparing coefficients of nested nonlinear probability models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 11(3), pages 420-438, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    higher education; occupational outcomes; social inequality; institutional stratification;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • A23 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Graduate
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • A2 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics

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