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State export data: origin of movement vs. origin of production

Author

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  • Cassey, Andrew

Abstract

The Origin of Movement (OM) series is unique data documenting the destination of state ex- ports. This data indicates the state an export begins its journey, not the production location (OP). Recent OM data has not been examined to determine if it represents OP. Here the collection, dissemination, and limitations of the OM data are described. Diagnostic tests asses how eectively the OM data represents OP. Results indicate the OM data are usable for OP, though there are idiosyncratic subsectors and states, and systematic dierences distinguishing the OM from OP.

Suggested Citation

  • Cassey, Andrew, 2006. "State export data: origin of movement vs. origin of production," MPRA Paper 3352, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:3352
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/3352/1/MPRA_paper_3352.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cletus Coughlin & Howard Wall, 2003. "NAFTA and the changing pattern of state exports," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 82(4), pages 427-450, November.
    2. Cletus C. Coughlin & Patricia S. Pollard, 2000. "State exports and the Asian crisis," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 3-14.
    3. Andrew B. Bernard & J. Bradford Jensen, 1994. "Exporters, Jobs and Wages in U.S. Manufacturing: 1976-1987," Working papers 95-7, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    4. Cletus C. Coughlin & Thomas B. Mandelbaum, 1991. "Measuring state exports: is there a better way?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jul, pages 65-79.
    5. Robert C. Feenstra & John Romalis & Peter K. Schott, 2002. "U.S. Imports, Exports, and Tariff Data, 1989-2001," NBER Working Papers 9387, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cletus C. Coughlin & Dennis Novy, 2013. "Is the International Border Effect Larger than the Domestic Border Effect? Evidence from US Trade," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 59(2), pages 249-276, June.
    2. Janet Koech & Mark A. Wynne, 2017. "Diversification and Specialization of U.S. States," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 47(1), pages 63-91, Winter.
    3. Andrew J Cassey & Katherine N Schmeiser, 2013. "The agglomeration by destination of U.S. state exports," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1504-1510.
    4. Tomasz Brodzicki & Stanislaw Uminski, 2013. "International trade relations of enterprises established in Poland's regions: gravity model panel estimation," Working Papers 1301, Instytut Rozwoju, Institute for Development.
    5. Coughlin, Cletus C., 2014. "The great trade collapse and rebound: a state-by-state view," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 96(1), pages 13-33.
    6. Steingress, Walter, 2015. "The Causal Impact of Migration on US Trade: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 9058, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Andrew J. Cassey, 2011. "State Foreign Export Patterns," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 308-329, October.
    8. Cristea, Anca D., 2011. "Buyer-seller relationships in international trade: Evidence from U.S. States' exports and business-class travel," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 207-220, July.
    9. Justin Caron, Sebastian Rausch, and Niven Winchester, 2015. "Leakage from sub-national climate policy: The case of Californias capandtrade program," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    10. Thi Mai Phuong, Chu & Tu, Thuy Anh, 2014. "On the border effect in the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP)," Papers 910, World Trade Institute.
    11. Coughlin, Cletus C. & Novy, Dennis, 2016. "Estimating Border Effects: The Impact of Spatial Aggregation," Working Papers 2016-6, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    12. Sauré, Philip & Zoabi, Hosny, 2014. "International trade, the gender wage gap and female labor force participation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 17-33.
    13. Andrew J. Cassey, 2012. "California'S Exports And The 2004 Overseas Office Closures," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(3), pages 641-651, July.
    14. Philip Sauré & Hosny Zoabi, 2009. "Effects of Trade on Female Labor Force Participation," Working Papers 2009-12, Swiss National Bank.
    15. Fabien Candau & Elisa Dienesch, 2015. "Spatial distribution of skills and regional trade integration," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(2), pages 451-488, March.
    16. Yilmazkuday, Hakan, 2009. "Is the Armington Elasticity Really Constant across Importers?," MPRA Paper 15954, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    international trade; exports; states; origin of movement; origin of production;

    JEL classification:

    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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