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Managing Markets for Toxic Assets

  • House, Christopher
  • Masatlioglu, Yusufcan

We present a model in which banks trade toxic assets to fund investments. Adverse selection in toxic assets reduces liquidity and investment. Investment is inefficiently low because banks must sell high-quality assets below their "fair" value. We consider whether equity injections and asset purchases improve market outcomes. By allowing banks to fund investments without selling high-quality assets, equity injections reduce the number of high-quality assets traded and further contaminate the interbank market. If equity is directed to firms with the greatest liquidity needs, the contamination effect causes investment to fall. Asset purchase programs often improve liquidity, investment and welfare.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 24590.

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Date of creation: 22 Jun 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:24590
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