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Asymmetric Information and the Death of ABS CDOs

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  • Daniel O. Beltran
  • Lawrence R. Cordell
  • Charles P. Thomas

Abstract

A key feature of the 2007 financial crisis is that for many securities trading had ceased; where trading did occur, market prices were well below intrinsic values, especially for ABS CDOs. One explanation is that information had been asymmetric, with sellers having better information than buyers. We first show the information advantages sellers had over buyers in both the issuance of CDOs and, through vertical integration, performance of the CDO collateral that could well have disrupted trading after the onset of the crisis. Using a ?workhorse\" model for pricing securities under asymmetric information and a novel dataset, we show how adverse selection could explain why the bulk of these securities either traded at significant discounts or did not trade at all.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel O. Beltran & Lawrence R. Cordell & Charles P. Thomas, 2013. "Asymmetric Information and the Death of ABS CDOs," International Finance Discussion Papers 1075, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:1075
    DOI: 10.17016/IFDP.2016.1075r
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Caccioli, Fabio & Shrestha, Munik & Moore, Cristopher & Farmer, J. Doyne, 2014. "Stability analysis of financial contagion due to overlapping portfolios," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 233-245.
    2. Nicolás Figueroa & Oksana Leukhina & Carlos Ramirez, 2018. "Imperfect Information Transmission from Banks to Investors: Macroeconomic Implications," Working Papers 2018-18, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 05 Dec 2019.
    3. House, Christopher L. & Masatlioglu, Yusufcan, 2015. "Managing markets for toxic assets," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 84-99.
    4. van der Plaat, Mark & Spierdijk, Laura, 2020. "Recourse, asymmetric information, and credit risk over the business cycle," MPRA Paper 104718, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Broer, Tobias, 2016. "Securitisation Bubbles: Structured finance with disagreement about default correlations," CEPR Discussion Papers 11145, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Svatopluk Kapounek, 2017. "The Impact of Institutional Quality on Bank Lending Activity: Evidence from Bayesian Model Averaging," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 67(5), pages 372-395, October.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    CDO; Securitization; Asymmetric; Lemons;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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