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How effective is a Big Push to the Small? Evidence from a Quasi-random Experiment

Author

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  • Mallick, Debdulal

Abstract

This paper, using data from a quasi-random control experiment on BRAC’s “Targeting the Ultra Poor” program in Bangladesh, investigates whether a one-off large grant to the extreme poor enables them to participate in the regular microfinance program that typically excludes them. The extreme poor were provided income-generating assets and continued support over 18 months that included, among others, enterprise management assistance, subsistence allowance, and support for building social network. Some eligible extreme poor who did not receive assets for reasons unrelated to the ones that can lead to self-selection bias are treated as the control group. The results for 2002 baseline and 2005 repeat survey data show that such a big push has indeed significant impact on graduation to the regular microfinance program. Social capital has significant effect on borrowing decision, and awareness of social and legal issues has significant effect on both NGO membership and borrowing decision.

Suggested Citation

  • Mallick, Debdulal, 2009. "How effective is a Big Push to the Small? Evidence from a Quasi-random Experiment," MPRA Paper 22824, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:22824
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/22824/1/MPRA_paper_22824.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Morduch, Jonathan & Ravi, Shamika & Bauchet, Jonathan, 2012. "Failure vs. Displacement: Why an Innovative Anti-Poverty Program Showed No Net Impact," CEI Working Paper Series 2012-05, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    2. Robert Cull & Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Jonathan Morduch, 2014. "Banks and Microbanks," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 46(1), pages 1-53, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Extreme poverty; microfinance; social capital; awareness; cognitive skills; control experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments

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