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Inflation Targeting Framework: Is the story different for Asian Economies?


  • Naqvi, Bushra
  • Rizvi, Syed Kumail Abbas


This paper aims to measure and compare the economic performance of four Asian economies who adopted Inflation Targeting (Indonesia, Philippines, South Korea and Thailand) against their six neighboring Asian non-targeting economies (China, Hong Kong, India, Malaysia, Singapore and Pakistan). Using the methodology of Ball and Sheridan, firstly, behavior of inflation, output growth and short term interest rate has been measured for both groups (Targeters vs. Non-Targeters) in pre and post IT adoption period in order to see whether performance has improved in targeting countries after the adoption of IT. Secondly, we try to find out whether Inflation Targeting has played any significant role in the changed behavior of these variables. Thirdly, we measure the effect of output gap and supply shock on inflation and see whether economic structure of these countries has changed between pre and post targeting period; and then we measure the role of IT in the structural change of these economies if there is any. The results force us to believe that economic performance has improved in all Asian economies in post targeting period. However, IT does not seem to play any significant role in this improvement of targeting countries. In addition to this, we find strong evidence that all variables showed strong reversion to mean suggesting that improved performance of variables today is in fact the outcome of poor economic performance in the past.

Suggested Citation

  • Naqvi, Bushra & Rizvi, Syed Kumail Abbas, 2009. "Inflation Targeting Framework: Is the story different for Asian Economies?," MPRA Paper 19546, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:19546

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Corbo, Vittorio & Landerretche, Oscar & Schmidt-Hebbel, Klaus, 2001. "Assessing Inflation Targeting after a Decade of World Experience," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(4), pages 343-368, October.
    2. Goncalves, Carlos Eduardo S. & Salles, Joao M., 2008. "Inflation targeting in emerging economies: What do the data say?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1-2), pages 312-318, February.
    3. Laurence M. Ball & Niamh Sheridan, 2004. "Does Inflation Targeting Matter?," NBER Chapters,in: The Inflation-Targeting Debate, pages 249-282 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Stephen G. Cecchetti & Michael Ehrmann, 2002. "Does Inflation Targeting Increase Output Volatility?: An International Comparison of Policymakers' Preferences and Outcomes," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Norman Loayza & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Series (ed.), Monetary Policy: Rules and Transmission Mechanisms, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 9, pages 247-274 Central Bank of Chile.
    5. International Monetary Fund, 2005. "Inflation Targeting Lite' in Small Open Economies; The Case of Mauritius," IMF Working Papers 05/172, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Philip Arestis & Fernando Ferrari-Filho & Luiz Fernando de Paula, 2011. "Inflation targeting in Brazil," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(2), pages 127-148.
    7. Brito, Ricardo D. & Bystedt, Brianne, 2010. "Inflation targeting in emerging economies: Panel evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 198-210, March.
    8. Frederic S. Mishkin & Adam S. Posen, 1997. "Inflation targeting: lessons from four countries," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Aug, pages 9-110.
    9. Berument, Hakan & Yuksel, Ebru, 2007. "Effects of adopting inflation targeting regimes on inflation variability," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 375(1), pages 265-273.
    10. Andrew T. Levin & Fabio M. Natalucci & Jeremy M. Piger, 2004. "The macroeconomic effects of inflation targeting," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jul, pages 51-80.
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter J. Morgan, 2013. "Monetary Policy Frameworks in Asia : Experience, Lessons, and Issues," Finance Working Papers 23639, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    2. Ismail H. Genc & Mehmet Balcilar, 2012. "Effectiveness of Inflation Targeting in Turkey," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(S5), pages 35-47, November.
    3. Alexandra Born & Sarwat Jahan & Edward R Gemayel, 2011. "What Can Low-Income Countries Expect From Adopting Inflation Targeting?," IMF Working Papers 11/276, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Ismail H. Genc & Mehmet Balcilar, 2012. "Effectiveness of Inflation Targeting in Turkey," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 48(S5), pages 35-47, November.

    More about this item


    Inflation Targeting; Asian countries; Output gap; Targeters vs Non Targeters; Economic Performance;

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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