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Education and labour productivity in New Zealand

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  • Razzak, Weshah
  • Timmins, Jason

Abstract

We estimate the effect of four types of education qualifications, as a proxy for human capital and skill levels, on GDP per capita, and compute the average percentage returns. We also test the effect of the product of each proxy of human capital with R&D on GDP per capita. We find that only university qualification and its product with R&D to have a positive effect on the average economy-wide productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Razzak, Weshah & Timmins, Jason, 2007. "Education and labour productivity in New Zealand," MPRA Paper 1880, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:1880
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Edward C. Prescott, 2002. "Prosperity and Depression: 2002 Richard T. Ely Lecture," Working Papers 618, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    2. Robin Johnson & W. A. Razzak & Steven Stillman, 2007. "Has New Zealand benefited from its investments in research & development?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(19), pages 2425-2440.
    3. Daron Acemoglu, 2002. "Directed Technical Change," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(4), pages 781-809.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Grant Scobie, 2015. "Long-run Fiscal Projections under Uncertainty: The Case of New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 15/10, New Zealand Treasury.
    2. John Creedy & Grant Scobie, 2017. "Debt projections and fiscal sustainability with feedback effects," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(3), pages 237-261, September.
    3. Yuxin Li & Derek Bosworth, 2020. "R&D spillovers in a supply chain and productivity performance in British firms," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 177-204, February.
    4. Neagu Olimpia, 2012. "Labour Productivity And Human Capital In The Eu Countries:An Empirical Analys," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 324-331, July.
    5. Elke Loichinger, 2015. "Labor force projections up to 2053 for 26 EU countries, by age, sex, and highest level of educational attainment," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(15), pages 443-486.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour productivity; education qualification; R&D;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D20 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - General
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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