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Distribution of Demand for School Quality: Evidence from Quantile Regression

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  • Wada, Roy
  • Herbert, Zahirovic-Herbert

Abstract

Our results show that high-income families place significantly higher value on academic achievement than low-income families. High-income families are also more likely to penalize house price for non-desirable non-academic school quality. This paper uses quantile regression to examine the distribution of demand for school quality. For academic achievement, the average effects as estimated by OLS are biased toward zero due to “aggregation” of families’ willingness to pay. We take advantage of a court-ordered redistricting as a quasi-random assignment of school quality. Subdivision and school fixed-effects are used to control for unobserved characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Wada, Roy & Herbert, Zahirovic-Herbert, 2009. "Distribution of Demand for School Quality: Evidence from Quantile Regression," MPRA Paper 18078, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:18078
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sandra E. Black, 1999. "Do Better Schools Matter? Parental Valuation of Elementary Education," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 577-599.
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    3. Haurin, Donald R. & Brasington, David, 1996. "School Quality and Real House Prices: Inter- and Intrametropolitan Effects," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 351-368, December.
    4. William Gould, 1998. "Interquartile and simultaneous-quantile regression," Stata Technical Bulletin, StataCorp LP, vol. 7(38).
    5. Figlio, David N., 1999. "Functional form and the estimated effects of school resources," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 241-252, April.
    6. Hastings, Justine S. & Kane, Thomas J. & Staiger, Douglas O., 2005. "Parental Preferences and School Competition: Evidence from a Public School Choice Program," Working Papers 10, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    7. William Gould, 1993. "Quantile regression with bootstrapped standard errors," Stata Technical Bulletin, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(9).
    8. Koenker,Roger, 2005. "Quantile Regression," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521845731.
    9. Geoffrey Turnbull & Jonathan Dombrow, 2006. "Spatial Competition and Shopping Externalities: Evidence from the Housing Market," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 391-408, June.
    10. Patrick Bayer & Fernando Ferreira & Robert McMillan, 2004. "Tiebout Sorting, Social Multipliers and the Demand for School Quality," NBER Working Papers 10871, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    13. Kathy J. Hayes & Lori L. Taylor, 1996. "Neighborhood school characteristics: what signals quality to homebuyers?," Economic and Financial Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q IV, pages 2-9.
    14. Brian A. Jacob & Lars Lefgren, 2007. "What Do Parents Value in Education? An Empirical Investigation of Parents' Revealed Preferences for Teachers," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(4), pages 1603-1637.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    school quality; demand; house price; quantile regression; hedonic equation;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design
    • R5 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis

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