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Exchange Rate Volatility, Currency Substitution and Monetary Policy in Nigeria

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  • Yinusa, D. Olalekan

Abstract

This study analyzes the implications of currency substitution and exchange rate volatility for monetary policy in Nigeria. It adopts the unrestricted portfolio balance model of currency substitution, incorporating exchange rate volatility within the framework of the Vector Error Correction (VEC) technique. Results from both impulse response and the forecast error variance decomposition functions suggest that exchange rate volatility and currency substitution responds to monetary policy with some lags meaning that monetary policy may be effective in dampening exchange rate volatility and currency substitution in the medium horizon but might not be effective in the short horizon. The study concludes that currency substitution was not an instant reaction to the slightest policy mistake rather; it was fallout from prolonged period of macroeconomic instability. The major sources of this instability in Nigeria were untamed fiscal deficits leading to high domestic inflation, real parallel market exchange rate volatility, and speculative business activities of market agents in the foreign exchange rate market and poor/inconsistent or uncertainty in public policies. In terms of policy choice, our result favours exchange rate based monetary policy as against interest based monetary policy for stabilization in dollarized economies like Nigeria.

Suggested Citation

  • Yinusa, D. Olalekan, 2008. "Exchange Rate Volatility, Currency Substitution and Monetary Policy in Nigeria," MPRA Paper 16255, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:16255
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/16255/1/MPRA_paper_16255.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Branson, William H. & Henderson, Dale W., 1985. "The specification and influence of asset markets," Handbook of International Economics,in: R. W. Jones & P. B. Kenen (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 15, pages 749-805 Elsevier.
    2. Ben S. Bernanke & Ilian Mihov, 1998. "Measuring Monetary Policy," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(3), pages 869-902.
    3. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
    4. Girton, Lance & Roper, Don E, 1981. "Theory and Implications of Currency Substitution," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 13(1), pages 12-30, February.
    5. Cushman, David O. & Zha, Tao, 1997. "Identifying monetary policy in a small open economy under flexible exchange rates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 433-448, August.
    6. Eduardo Levy Yeyati, 2006. "Financial dollarization: evaluating the consequences," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 21(45), pages 61-118, January.
    7. Andrea Brischetto & Graham Voss, 1999. "A Structural Vector Autoregression Model of Monetary Policy in Australia," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp1999-11, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    8. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff & Miguel A. Savastano, 2014. "Addicted to Dollars," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(1), pages 1-50, May.
    9. Germana Corrado, 2008. "An open economy model with currency substitution and real dollarization," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(1), pages 69-93, January.
    10. Faust, Jon & Leeper, Eric M, 1997. "When Do Long-Run Identifying Restrictions Give Reliable Results?," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(3), pages 345-353, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yinusa, D. Olalekan, 2009. "Macroeconomic Fluctuations and Deposit Dollarization in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Panel Data," MPRA Paper 16259, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2009.
    2. repec:eco:journ1:2017-04-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Raheem, Ibrahim D. & Asongu, Simplice A., 2016. "Extending the Determinants of Dollarization in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Role of Easy Access to Foreign Exchange Earnings," MPRA Paper 75415, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demand for money; Exchange Rate Volatility; Currency Substitution; Monetary Policy and Nigeria;

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money

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