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On Teachers Quality Decline

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  • Amodio, Francesco

Abstract

Evidence suggests the average ability of teachers to have progressively declined in developed countries over the last decades. Many explanations have been proposed, all suggesting the idea of a lower attractiveness of teaching professions (both in monetary and non monetary terms) with respect to feasible alternative working opportunities. This should apply to women at least, because of the great expansion of job opportunities which interested female cohorts in the second half of the century. However, the long lasting problem of getting credible ability measures has often driven partial results. Here two UK population samples of individuals born in different years are considered. Individuals were exposed to ability tests at early stages of their life, so that subsequent education paths are exogenous to test scores. Transformation in percentiles allows to get comparable measures of ability, and distributions for those who undertook the teaching career are obtained in the two samples. Consistently with previous literature, using difference-in-difference, we find evidence of teachers quality decline. A gender based analysis is performed in order to address gender differences and specific questions. Data on salaries, ditributions across jobs and social mobility are finally used in order to find possible explanations. Further questions arise.

Suggested Citation

  • Amodio, Francesco, 2009. "On Teachers Quality Decline," MPRA Paper 15796, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:15796
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/15796/1/MPRA_paper_15796.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hanushek, Eric A. & Pace, Richard R., 1995. "Who chooses to teach (and why)?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 101-117, June.
    2. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 8769.
    3. Dolton, Peter J, 1990. "The Economics of UK Teacher Supply: The Graduate's Decision," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(400), pages 91-104, Supplemen.
    4. Dolton, P. J. & Makepeace, G. H., 1993. "Female labour force participation and the choice of occupation: The supply of teachers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(7), pages 1393-1411, October.
    5. Grönqvist, Erik & Vlachos, Jonas, 2008. "One Size Fits All? The Effects of Teacher Cognitive and Non-cognitive Abilities on Student," Working Paper Series 779, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    6. Dale Ballou & Michael Podgursky, 1996. "Teacher Pay and Teacher Quality," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number tptq, November.
    7. Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 1999. "Do Higher Salaries Buy Better Teachers?," NBER Working Papers 7082, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Arnaud Chevalier & Peter Dolton, 2004. "The labour market for teachers," Working Papers 200411, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    9. Dolton, Peter J & Mavromaras, Kostas G, 1994. "Intergenerational Occupational Choice Comparisons: The Case of Teachers in the UK," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(425), pages 841-863, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    teachers quality; ability measure; NCDS; BCS; difference in difference; social mobility;

    JEL classification:

    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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