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Intergenerational Occupational Choice Comparisons: The Case of Teachers in the UK

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  • Dolton, Peter J
  • Mavromaras, Kostas G

Abstract

This paper examines how U.K. graduate occupational choices have changed since 1970, with reference to the choice of becoming a teacher using two cohorts of data. Remuneration, morale, status, and image of the teaching profession have been altered dramatically. The sensitivity of the teacher choice to relative wage changes is examined and compared for men and women separately. The paper presents a counterfactual prediction of the decisions that each cohort would have made had they experienced the market conditions of the other and estimates a decomposition of the changes in the average probabilities due to remunerative and other factors. Copyright 1994 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Dolton, Peter J & Mavromaras, Kostas G, 1994. "Intergenerational Occupational Choice Comparisons: The Case of Teachers in the UK," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(425), pages 841-863, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:104:y:1994:i:425:p:841-63
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    Cited by:

    1. Amodio, Francesco, 2009. "On Teachers Quality Decline," MPRA Paper 15796, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Bonesronning, Hans & Falch, Torberg & Strom, Bjarne, 2005. "Teacher sorting, teacher quality, and student composition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 457-483, February.
    3. Torberg Falch, 2010. "The Elasticity of Labor Supply at the Establishment Level," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(2), pages 237-266, April.
    4. Elizabeth Webster & Mark Wooden & Gary Marks, 2004. "Reforming the Labour Market for Australian Teachers," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2004n28, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Stefan Denzler & Stefan C. Wolter, 2009. "Laufbahnentscheide im Lehrberuf aus bildungsökonomischer Sicht," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0041, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    6. Jere R. Behrman & Michela M. Tincani & Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2016. "Teacher Quality in Public and Private Schools under a Voucher System: The Case of Chile," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(2), pages 319-362.
    7. repec:aec:ebooks:12 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Arnaud Chevalier & Peter Dolton & Steven Mcintosh, 2007. "Recruiting and Retaining Teachers in the UK: An Analysis of Graduate Occupation Choice from the 1960s to the 1990s," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(293), pages 69-96, February.
    9. Hans Bonesrønning & Torberg Falch & Bjarne Strøm, 2003. "Teacher Sorting, Teacher Quality, and Student Composition: Evidence from Norway," Working Paper Series 3403, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    10. Arnaud Chevalier & Peter Dolton, 2004. "The labour market for teachers," Working Papers 200411, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    11. Torberg Falch & Bjarne Strøm, 2003. "Teacher Turnover and Non-Pecuniary Factors," Working Paper Series 3604, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

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