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Accommodating Employees with Disabilities: The Role of Flexible Employment Schemes in Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Giovanis, Eleftherios
  • Ozdamar, Oznur

Abstract

Over the past 30 years, the workplace has witnessed significant changes. The fast growth in the use of information technology, changes in working hours and agreements radically changed the nature of job. One such change is the flexible employment schemes, which can provide alternatives for employees with disabilities, giving incentives to increase their productivity and their job satisfaction. The aim of this study is to examine the impact of those schemes on job satisfaction, job quality and absenteeism in this group of people. Furthermore, the objective is to explore the role of flexible employment to carers of disabled people. The empirical analysis relies on the European Working Conditions Survey over the period 2000-2015. The results show a positive impact on both disabled workers and carers’ job satisfaction and lower incidence of absenteeism at work. The policy recommendations and implications are further discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanis, Eleftherios & Ozdamar, Oznur, 2019. "Accommodating Employees with Disabilities: The Role of Flexible Employment Schemes in Europe," MPRA Paper 104592, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:104592
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/104592/1/MPRA_paper_104592.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Clark, Andrew E & Oswald, Andrew J, 1994. "Unhappiness and Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 648-659, May.
    2. Beauregard, T. Alexandra & Henry, Lesley C., 2009. "Making the link between work-life balance practices and organizational performance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 25224, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Paul Frijters & John P. Haisken-DeNew & Michael A. Shields, 2004. "Money Does Matter! Evidence from Increasing Real Income and Life Satisfaction in East Germany Following Reunification," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 730-740, June.
    4. Edward E. Potter, 2003. "Telecommuting: The Future of Work, Corporate Culture, and American Society," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 24(1), pages 73-84, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eberegbe, Georgina & Giovanis, Eleftherios, 2020. "Exploring The Impact of Job Satisfaction Domains on Firm Performance: Evidence from Great Britain," MPRA Paper 104046, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Disability; European Working Conditions Survey; Flexible Employment Schemes; Flexi-Time; Health Conditions; Homework; Job Quality; Job Satisfaction; Teleworking; Wage Gap;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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