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Chocs externes, Institutions démocratiques et Résilience économique
[External shocks, democratic institutions and economic resilience]

Author

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  • Trabelsi, Mohamed Ali
  • Ahmed, Salah

Abstract

This paper examines the role of democracy in strengthening the resilience of developing economies in the face of exogenous external shocks. Our study uses the duration model to estimate how external shocks and democracy determine the probable duration of a spell of economic growth. Examining a panel of 96 developing countries observed over the 1965-2015 period, we found that democracy is a resilience factor, insofar as it helps to support growth spells in the event of negative external shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Trabelsi, Mohamed Ali & Ahmed, Salah, 2020. "Chocs externes, Institutions démocratiques et Résilience économique [External shocks, democratic institutions and economic resilience]," MPRA Paper 100382, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:100382
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Resilience; Economic growth; Developing countries; Democracy; Survival models.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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