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Structural Breaks and Unit Roots: A Further Test of the Sustainability of the Indian Fiscal Deficit

  • Raghbendra Jha

    ()

  • Anurag Sharma

If public expenditure and public revenue are I(0) public debt is sustainable but if these are I(1) and not cointegrated or have a cointegrating vector di erent from [1, -1] the public debt is said to be unsustainable. Extant work indicates that India’s public debt is unsustainable. We re-investigate this issue by allowing for endogenous structural breaks for two data sets - the British period 1871-1921 and the post independence period 1950-1997. Revenue and expenditure series (nominal as well as real) are trend stationary with structural breaks, at least for the post independence period. Thus Indian public debt is not unsustainable.

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File URL: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/acde/asarc/pdf/papers/2001/WP2001_08.pdf
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Paper provided by The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre in its series ASARC Working Papers with number 2001-08.

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Length: 26
Date of creation: Sep 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pas:asarcc:2001-08
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  1. James D. Hamilton & Marjorie A. Flavin, 1985. "On the Limitations of Government Borrowing: A Framework for Empirical Testing," NBER Working Papers 1632, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Perron, Pierre, 1989. "The Great Crash, the Oil Price Shock, and the Unit Root Hypothesis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(6), pages 1361-1401, November.
  3. Uctum, Merih & Wickens, Michael R., 1997. "Debt and Deficit Ceilings, and Sustainability of Fiscal Policies: An Intertemporal Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 1612, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Anindya Banerjee & Robin L. Lumsdaine & James H. Stock, 1990. "Recursive and Sequential Tests of the Unit Root and Trend Break Hypothesis: Theory and International Evidence," NBER Working Papers 3510, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. David W. Wilcox, 1987. "The substainability of government deficits: implications of the present- value borrowing constraint," Working Paper Series / Economic Activity Section 77, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  6. Robin L. Lumsdaine & David H. Papell, 1997. "Multiple Trend Breaks And The Unit-Root Hypothesis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(2), pages 212-218, May.
  7. Hall, Alastair R, 1994. "Testing for a Unit Root in Time Series with Pretest Data-Based Model Selection," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(4), pages 461-70, October.
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