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Primary Determinants And The Spatial Distribution Of Corruption

  • David L. Ortega

    ()

  • Raymond J.G.M. Florax

    ()

  • Benoit A. Delbecq

    ()

    (Dept. of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN)

This paper analyzes the spatial distribution of corruption and its primary economic and political determinants. Economic freedom and development are found to lower incidences of corruption. Of notable significance, this study finds empirical evidence of a non-linear relationship between a country’s level of democracy and corruption. Extreme authoritarian regimes are found to have lower corruption levels than hybrid regimes, but past a certain threshold democracy inhibits corruption. More importantly the analysis in this paper finds that the economic and political actions of a country have a significant impact on corruption levels worldwide.

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File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/bitstream/101395/2/10-6.pdf
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Paper provided by Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics in its series Working Papers with number 10-6.

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Length: 18 pages
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pae:wpaper:10-6
Contact details of provider: Postal: 1145 Krannert Building, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1145
Phone: 765 494-4191
Fax: 765 494-9176
Web page: http://www.agecon.purdue.edu/

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  1. Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1998. "The Quality of Government," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1847, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  2. Becker, Sascha O. & Egger, Peter H. & Seidel, Tobias, 2009. "Common political culture: Evidence on regional corruption contagion," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 300-310, September.
  3. Alicia Adsera & Carles Boix & Mark Payne, 2000. "Are You Being Served?: Political Accountability and Quality of Government," Research Department Publications 4241, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  4. Tugrul Gurgur & Anwar Shah, 2008. "Localization and corruption: panacea or pandora's box?," CEMA Working Papers 581, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
  5. Miguel Braun & Rafael Di tella, 2004. "Inflation, Inflation Variability, and Corruption," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(1), pages 77-100, 03.
  6. G�ran Therborn & K.C. Ho, 2009. "Introduction," City, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 53-62, March.
  7. J. Barkley Rosser, 2009. "Introduction," Chapters, in: Handbook of Research on Complexity, chapter 1 Edward Elgar.
  8. Treisman, Daniel, 2000. "The causes of corruption: a cross-national study," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 399-457, June.
  9. Kelejian, Harry H. & Prucha, Ingmar R., 2007. "HAC estimation in a spatial framework," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 131-154, September.
  10. Paldam, Martin, 2002. "The cross-country pattern of corruption: economics, culture and the seesaw dynamics," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 215-240, June.
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