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Remittances: Dutch disease or export-led growth?

Author

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  • Ghada Fayad

Abstract

The literature on remittances and growth has thus far established a positive link between remittances and overall economic growth in recipient countries. We identify the main transmission channel through which remittances seem to exert their growth-enhancing effects: the 'export-led growth' channel using a methodology that exploits both cross-country and within-country cross-industry variation, and correcting for the endogeneity of remittances by constructing a set of external instruments. We find that remittances are conducive to the relative growth of exporting industries within teh manufacturing sector of recipient economies, contrary to what standard Dutch disease theory suggests. In doing so, we control for the potential complementarity effect between migrant networks and international trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Ghada Fayad, 2011. "Remittances: Dutch disease or export-led growth?," OxCarre Working Papers 057, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:oxcrwp:057
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    File URL: http://www.oxcarre.ox.ac.uk/images/stories/papers/ResearchPapers/oxcarrerp201157.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Farid Farid, 2014. "The impact of exchange rate policy on remittances in Morocco: A Threshold VAR analysis," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(4), pages 2351-2360.
    2. Farid MAKHLOUF, 2013. "Remittances and Dutch Disease: A Meta-Analysis," Working Papers 2013-2014_8, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Dec 2013.
    3. Mohaddes Kamiar & Raissi Mehdi, 2013. "Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 9(2), pages 99-131, August.
    4. Jean-Louis Combes & Christian Hubert Ebeke & Mathilde Maurel & Thierry Urbain Yogo, 2014. "Remittances and Working Poverty," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(10), pages 1348-1361, November.
    5. Nuno Baetas da Silva & João Sousa Andrade & António Portugal Duarte, 2016. "Alternative Sources of Dutch Disease: A Survey of the Literature," GEMF Working Papers 2016-10, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    6. Taguchi, Hiroyuki & Lar, Ni, 2017. "Emigrant’s remittances, Dutch Disease and capital accumulation in Mekong countries," MPRA Paper 80637, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Taguchi, Hiroyuki & Shammi, Rifah Tamannah, 2017. "Emigrant’s remittances, Dutch Disease and capital accumulation: the case of Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 80703, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jun 2017.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Remittances; manufacturing; export-led growth; Dutch disease; migrant networks;

    JEL classification:

    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation

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