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Saving and growth in an open economy

Concern has been raised by an apparent lack of saving in New Zealand. It is often argued that policies which foster savings are important, as higher savings will contribute to higher economic growth. This paper investigates the link between saving, investment and growth. In particular, it focuses on issues potentially important in an open economy such as New Zealand. Theory predicts that increased total saving will lead to higher investment and output. In an open economy, total saving comprises saving by domestic agents (government, firms and households) plus foreign saving. Diversified portfolios, large inflows of foreign investment into New Zealand and investment rates comparable to those in other OECD countries suggest that New Zealand, so far, has been able to access foreign saving to meet investment demands. Domestic saving does not appear to have constrained investment and hence growth.

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File URL: http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/research-policy/wp/2001/01-32/twp01-32.pdf
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Paper provided by New Zealand Treasury in its series Treasury Working Paper Series with number 01/32.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nzt:nztwps:01/32
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Web page: http://www.treasury.govt.nz

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  19. Orazio P. Attanasio & Lucio Picci & Antonello E. Scorcu, 2000. "Saving, Growth, and Investment: A Macroeconomic Analysis Using a Panel of Countries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(2), pages 182-211, May.
  20. Geweke, John & Meese, Richard & Dent, Warren, 1983. "Comparing alternative tests of causality in temporal systems : Analytic results and experimental evidence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 161-194, February.
  21. Corbin, Annie, 2001. "Country specific effect in the Feldstein-Horioka paradox: a panel data analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 72(3), pages 297-302, September.
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