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How Often Are Propositions on the Effects of Customs Unions Theoretical Curiosa and When Should They Guide Policy?

Author

Listed:
  • Lisandro Abrego
  • Raymond Riezman
  • John Whalley

Abstract

This paper uses computational techniques to assess whether or not various propositions that have been advanced as plausible in the literature on Customs Unions (or other regional trade agreements) may actually hold. The idea is to make probabilistic statements as to whether propositions of interest might hold, rather than to restrict assumptions so they unambiguously hold. Our aim is to blend theory and numerical simulation and go beyond the ambiguous analytically derived propositions that dominate the theoretical literature so as to assess the likelihood of propositions holding for particular model specifications.

Suggested Citation

  • Lisandro Abrego & Raymond Riezman & John Whalley, 2001. "How Often Are Propositions on the Effects of Customs Unions Theoretical Curiosa and When Should They Guide Policy?," NBER Working Papers 8304, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8304
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wooton, Ian, 1986. "Preferential trading agreements: An investigation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1-2), pages 81-97, August.
    2. Raymond RIEZMAN, 2013. "Customs Unions and the Core," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: International Trade Agreements and Political Economy, chapter 3, pages 33-43 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    3. Kowalczyk, Carsten, 1989. "Trade Negotiations and World Welfare," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(3), pages 552-559, June.
    4. Shoven, John B. & Whalley, John, 1974. "On the computation of competitive equilibrium on International markets with tariffs," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 341-354, November.
    5. R. G. Lipsey & Kelvin Lancaster, 1956. "The General Theory of Second Best," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(1), pages 11-32.
    6. John Kennan & Raymond Riezman, 2013. "Optimal Tariff Equilibria with Customs Unions," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: International Trade Agreements and Political Economy, chapter 5, pages 53-66 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    7. Raymond RIEZMAN, 2013. "A 3 × 3 Model of Customs Unions," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: International Trade Agreements and Political Economy, chapter 1, pages 7-20 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    8. Raymond Riezman, 1999. "Can Bilateral Trade Agreements Help Induce Free Trade," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 32(3), pages 751-766, May.
    9. Hamilton, Robert W & Whalley, John, 1985. "Geographically Discriminatory Trade Arrangements," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(3), pages 446-455, August.
    10. Carlo Perroni & John Whalley, 2000. "The new regionalism: trade liberalization or insurance?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 33(1), pages 1-24, February.
    11. Kehoe, Timothy J, 1980. "An Index Theorem for General Equilibrium Models with Production," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(5), pages 1211-1232, July.
    12. Kemp, Murray C. & Wan, Henry Jr., 1976. "An elementary proposition concerning the formation of customs unions," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 95-97, February.
    13. Perroni, Carlo & Whalley, John, 1996. "How Severe Is Global Retaliation Risk under Increasing Regionalism?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 57-61, May.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations

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