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Financial Sector Inefficiencies and Coordinate Failures: Implications for Crisis Management

  • Pierre-Richard Agenor
  • Joshua Aizenman

This paper analyzes the implication of inefficient financial intermediation for crisis management in a country where firms are highly-indebted. The analysis is based on a model in which firms rely on bank credit to finance their working capital needs and lenders face high state verification and enforcement costs of loan contracts. The analysis shows that higher contract enforcement and verification costs, lower expected productivity, or higher volatility, may shift the economy to the wrong side of the debt Laffer curve, with potentially sizable employment and output losses. The main implication of this analysis for the current policy debate on crisis management is East Asia is that dept reduction, in addition to debt rescheduling, may be required as part of the process of reducing financial sector inefficiencies.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w7446.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 7446.

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Date of creation: Dec 1999
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7446
Note: IFM
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  1. Marcus Miller & Joseph Stiglitz, 1999. "Bankruptcy Protection Against Macroeconomics Shocks: The case for a 'super Chapter 11'," CSGR Hot Topics: Research on Current Issues 08, Centre for the Study of Globalisation and Regionalisation (CSGR), University of Warwick.
  2. Jonathan Eaton & Mark Gersovitz & Joseph E. Stiglitz, 1986. "The Pure Theory of Country Risk," NBER Working Papers 1894, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Michael P. Dooley, 1998. "A model of crises in emerging markets," International Finance Discussion Papers 630, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Townsend, Robert M., 1979. "Optimal contracts and competitive markets with costly state verification," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 265-293, October.
  5. P.R. Agenor & J. Aizenman & A. Hoffmaister, 1998. "Contagion, Bank Lending Spreads and Output Fluctuations," NBER Working Papers 6850, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Krugman, Paul, 1988. "Financing vs. forgiving a debt overhang," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 253-268, November.
  7. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Joshua Aizenman, 1998. "Contagion and Volatility with Imperfect Credit Markets," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(2), pages 207-235, June.
  8. Elhanan Helpman, 1988. "The Simple Analytics of Debt-Equity Swaps," NBER Working Papers 2771, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 1996. "Foundations of International Macroeconomics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262150476, June.
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