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Missing Growth from Creative Destruction

Author

Listed:
  • Philippe Aghion
  • Antonin Bergeaud
  • Timo Boppart
  • Peter J. Klenow
  • Huiyu Li

Abstract

Statistical agencies typically impute inflation for disappearing products based on surviving products, which may result in overstated inflation and understated growth. Using U.S. Census data, we apply two ways of assessing the magnitude of “missing growth” for private nonfarm businesses from 1983–2013. The first approach exploits information on the market share of surviving plants. The second approach applies indirect inference to firm-level data. We find: (i) missing growth from imputation is substantial — at least 0.6 percentage points per year; and (ii) most of the missing growth is due to creative destruction (as opposed to new varieties).

Suggested Citation

  • Philippe Aghion & Antonin Bergeaud & Timo Boppart & Peter J. Klenow & Huiyu Li, 2017. "Missing Growth from Creative Destruction," NBER Working Papers 24023, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24023
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    JEL classification:

    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

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