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FinTech Adoption Across Generations: Financial Fitness in the Information Age

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  • Bruce Carlin
  • Arna Olafsson
  • Michaela Pagel

Abstract

This paper analyzes how better access to financial information via new technology changes use of consumer credit and affects financial fitness. We exploit the introduction of a smartphone application for personal financial management as a source of exogenous variation. FinTech adoption reduces financial fee payments and penalties, but differs cross-sectionally in the population. After adopting the new technology, Millennials and members of Generation X incur fewer financial fees and penalties, whereas Baby Boomers do not benefit from the technological advance. Millennials and Gen Xers save fees by using their credit cards rather than overdrafts to manage short-term liabilities. Moreover, Millennials shift some of their spending to discretionary entertainment, whereas members of Generation X remain more austere. Finally, while men tend to adopt new technology and access information at a higher rate, the economic impact of access is larger for women.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruce Carlin & Arna Olafsson & Michaela Pagel, 2017. "FinTech Adoption Across Generations: Financial Fitness in the Information Age," NBER Working Papers 23798, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23798
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    Cited by:

    1. Babak Naysary & Ruth Tacneng & Amine Tarazi, 2021. "Adoption of fintech services: role of saving and borrowing mechanisms," Working Papers hal-03335254, HAL.
    2. Hong, Claire Yurong & Lu, Xiaomeng & Pan, Jun, 2021. "FinTech adoption and household risk-taking," BOFIT Discussion Papers 14/2021, Bank of Finland Institute for Emerging Economies (BOFIT).
    3. Hong, Claire Yurong & Lu, Xiaomeng & Pan, Jun, 2021. "FinTech adoption and household risk-taking," BOFIT Discussion Papers 14/2021, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    4. Tasadduq Imam & Angelique McInnes & Sisira Colombage & Robert Grose, 2022. "Opportunities and Barriers for FinTech in SAARC and ASEAN Countries," JRFM, MDPI, vol. 15(2), pages 1-37, February.
    5. Kondratjeva, Olga & Roll, Stephen P. & Bufe, Sam & Grinstein-Weiss, Michal, 2021. "Using financial tips to guide debt repayment: Experimental evidence from low- and moderate-income tax filers," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 90(C).
    6. Gill, Andrej & Hett, Florian & Tischer, Johannes, 2022. "Time inconsistency and overdraft use: Evidence from transaction data and behavioral measurement experiments," Discussion Papers 18/2022, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    7. repec:zbw:bofitp:2021_014 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Pagel, Michaela & Olafsson, Arna, 2017. "The Ostrich in Us: Selective Attention to Financial Accounts, Income, Spending, and Liquidity," CEPR Discussion Papers 12259, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Ionela Voinea, 2020. "The banking system of emerging economies in Asia against the background of COVID-19. Case study – the ASEAN area," Journal of Financial Studies, Institute of Financial Studies, vol. 9(5), pages 134-146, November.
    10. Ozili, Peterson K, 2023. "Determinants of interest in eNaira and financial inclusion information in Nigeria: role of Fintech, cryptocurrency and central bank digital currency," MPRA Paper 115990, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Ozili, Peterson K, 2023. "Determinants of interest in eNaira and financial inclusion information in Nigeria: role of Fintech, cryptocurrency and central bank digital currency," MPRA Paper 116405, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Andrej Gill & Florian Hett & Johannes Tischer, 2022. "Time Inconsistency and Overdraft Use: Evidence from Transaction Data and Behavioral Measurement Experiments," Working Papers 2205, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.
    13. Nguyen Vinh Khuong & Nguyen Thi Thanh Phuong & Nguyen Thanh Liem & Cao Thi Mien Thuy & Tran Hung Son, 2022. "Factors Affecting the Intention to Use Financial Technology among Vietnamese Youth: Research in the Time of COVID-19 and Beyond," Economies, MDPI, vol. 10(3), pages 1-17, February.
    14. Christine Laudenbach & Jenny Pirschel & Stephan Siegel, 2018. "Personal Communication in an Automated World: Evidence from Loan Repayments," CESifo Working Paper Series 7295, CESifo.
    15. Gill, Andrej & Hett, Florian & Tischer, Johannes, 2022. "Time inconsistency and overdraft use: Evidence from transaction data and behavioral measurement experiments," SAFE Working Paper Series 347, Leibniz Institute for Financial Research SAFE.
    16. Santiago Carbó-Valverde & Pedro J. Cuadros-Solas & Francisco Rodríguez-Fernández, 2022. "Entrepreneurial, institutional and financial strategies for FinTech profitability," Financial Innovation, Springer;Southwestern University of Finance and Economics, vol. 8(1), pages 1-36, December.
    17. Chen Lian, 2021. "Mistakes in Future Consumption, High MPCs Now," NBER Working Papers 29517, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Fu, Jonathan & Mishra, Mrinal, 2022. "Fintech in the time of COVID−19: Technological adoption during crises," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 50(C).
    19. Ankita Das & Debabrata Das, 2020. "Perception, Adoption, and Pattern of Usage of FinTech Services by Bank Customers: Evidences from Hojai District of Assam," Emerging Economy Studies, International Management Institute, vol. 6(1), pages 7-22, May.
    20. Kanz, Martin & Breza, Emily & Klapper, Leora F., 2020. "Learning to Navigate a New Financial Technology: Evidence from Payroll Accounts," CEPR Discussion Papers 15565, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    21. Xiaohui Chen, 2023. "Information moderation principle on the regulatory sandbox," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 56(1), pages 111-128, February.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • G02 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Behavioral Finance: Underlying Principles

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