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Search Fatigue

Author

Listed:
  • Bruce Ian Carlin
  • Florian Ederer

Abstract

Consumer search is not only costly but also tiring. We characterize the intertemporal effects that search fatigue has on oligopoly prices, product proliferation, and the provision of consumer assistance (i.e., advice). These effects vary based on whether search is all-or-nothing or sequential in nature, whether learning takes place, and whether consumers exhibit brand loyalty. We perform welfare analysis and highlight the novel empirical implications that our analysis generates.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruce Ian Carlin & Florian Ederer, 2012. "Search Fatigue," NBER Working Papers 17895, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17895
    Note: CF IO POL
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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