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Financial Frictions and Firm Dynamics

Author

Listed:
  • Paul Bergin
  • Ling Feng
  • Ching-Yi Lin

Abstract

Firm entry dynamics are an integral part of the propagation of financial shocks to the real economy. A VAR documents that adverse financial shocks in the U.S. postwar period are associated with a fall in new firm creation and a fall in firm equity values. We propose a DSGE model with endogenous firm entry and financial frictions that is able to explain these facts. The model is novel in giving firms a choice of financing up-front entry costs through a combination of debt as well as equity, so that financial shocks directly impact the financing of firm entry. The model is also novel in making use of the asset pricing implications of the firm entry condition to explain the equity price response to a financial shock. The model indicates that free entry of new firms limits the ability of incumbent firms to respond to negative financial shocks through endogenous capital restructuring. Also, allowing the number of firms to fall after an adverse financial shock is a useful margin of macroeconomic adjustment, reducing the overall impact of the shock on aggregate output. This is because the remaining firms become financially stronger and better able to withstand a financial shock.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Bergin & Ling Feng & Ching-Yi Lin, 2014. "Financial Frictions and Firm Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 20099, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:20099
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Uusküla, Lenno, 2016. "Monetary transmission mechanism with firm turnover," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 1-18.
    2. Poutineau, Jean-Christophe & Vermandel, Gauthier, 2015. "Financial frictions and the extensive margin of activity," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(4), pages 525-554.
    3. Karwowski, Mariusz, 2016. "The risk in using financial reports in the study of airline business models," Journal of Air Transport Management, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 185-192.
    4. Fabio Ghironi, 2018. "Macro needs micro," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(1-2), pages 195-218.
    5. Lorenza Rossi, 2016. "Productivity Shocks and Uncertainty Shocks in a Model with Endogenous Firms Exit and Inefficient Banks," DEM Working Papers Series 128, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
    6. Lorenza Rossi, 2015. "Endogenous Firms' ?Exit, Inefficient Banks and Business Cycle Dynamics," Working Papers LuissLab 15117, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza, LUISS Guido Carli.
    7. Lorenza Rossi, 2018. "The Overshooting of Firms Destruction, Banks and Productivity Shocks," DEM Working Papers Series 147, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
    8. Matteo Bugamelli & Francesca Lotti & Monica Amici & Emanuela Ciapanna & Fabrizio Colonna & Francesco D’Amuri & Silvia Giacomelli & Andrea Linarello & Francesco Manaresi & Giuliana Palumbo & Filippo Sc, 2018. "Productivity growth in Italy: a tale of a slow-motion change," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 422, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    9. Tom Schmitz, 2016. "Endogenous Growth, Firm Heterogeneity and the Long-run Impact of Financial Crises," 2016 Meeting Papers 609, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. Lenno Uuskula, 2015. "Firm turnover and inflation dynamics," Bank of Estonia Working Papers wp2015-01, Bank of Estonia, revised 03 Feb 2015.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill

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