IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/18437.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The White/Black Educational Gap, Stalled Progress, and the Long Term Consequences of the Emergence of Crack Cocaine Markets

Author

Listed:
  • William N. Evans
  • Craig Garthwaite
  • Timothy J. Moore

Abstract

We propose the rise of crack cocaine markets as an explanation for the end to the convergence in black-white educational outcomes beginning in the mid-1980s. After constructing a measure to date the arrival of crack markets in cities and states, we show large increases in murder and incarceration rates after these dates. Black high school graduation rates also decline, and we estimate that crack markets accounts for between 40 and 73 percent of the fall in black male high school graduation rates. We argue that the primary mechanism is reduced educational investments in response to decreased returns to schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • William N. Evans & Craig Garthwaite & Timothy J. Moore, 2012. "The White/Black Educational Gap, Stalled Progress, and the Long Term Consequences of the Emergence of Crack Cocaine Markets," NBER Working Papers 18437, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18437
    Note: ED LS PE
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w18437.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2001:91:9:1446-1448_0 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Sean Corcoran & William N. Evans, 2010. "Income Inequality, the Median Voter, and the Support for Public Education," NBER Working Papers 16097, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The causes of the black-white education gap
      by nawmsayn in ZeeConomics on 2014-11-02 15:18:00

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Hunt, Jennifer, 2012. "The Impact of Immigration on the Educational Attainment of Natives," IZA Discussion Papers 6904, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Richard J. Murnane, 2013. "U.S. High School Graduation Rates: Patterns and Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 51(2), pages 370-422, June.
    3. Samuel Bondurant & jason lindo & Isaac Swensen, 2016. "Substance Abuse Treatment Centers and Local Crime," Working Papers id:11302, eSocialSciences.
    4. Vlaicu, Razvan & Whalley, Alexander, 2016. "Hierarchical accountability in government," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 85-99.
    5. Nora Gordon, 2014. "Explaining Trends in High School Graduation: The Changing Elementary and Secondary Education Policy Landscape and Income Inequality over the Last Half Century," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital in History: The American Record, pages 59-89 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Evan Taylor & Bryan Stuart, 2017. "The Effect of Social Connectedness on Crime: Evidence from the Great Migration," Working Papers 2017-24, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    7. repec:uab:wprdea:wpdea1410 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Roxana Gutierrez-Romero & Monica Oviedo Leon, 2014. "The good, the bad and the ugly: The socio-economic impact of drug cartels and their violence in Mexico," Working Papers wpdea1407, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    9. Kasey S. Buckles & Daniel M. Hungerman, 2016. "The Incidental Fertility Effects of School Condom Distribution Programs," NBER Working Papers 22322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Nora E. Gordon, 2013. "High School Graduation in the Context of Changing Elementary and Secondary Education Policy and Income Inequality: The Last Half Century," NBER Working Papers 19049, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. repec:eee:juecon:v:102:y:2017:i:c:p:22-33 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18437. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.