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How Does the Government (Want to) Fund Science? Politics, Lobbying and Academic Earmarks

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Listed:
  • John M. de Figueiredo
  • Brian S. Silverman

Abstract

This paper examines academic earmarks and their role in the funding of university research. It provides a summary and review of the evidence on the supply of earmarks by legislators. It then discusses the role of university lobbying for earmarks on the demand side. Finally, the paper examines the impact of earmarks on research quantity and quality.

Suggested Citation

  • John M. de Figueiredo & Brian S. Silverman, 2007. "How Does the Government (Want to) Fund Science? Politics, Lobbying and Academic Earmarks," NBER Working Papers 13459, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13459
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. A Abigail Payne, 2002. "Do US Congressional earmarks increase research output at universities?," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(5), pages 314-330, October.
    2. La Porta, Rafael & Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert, 1999. "The Quality of Government," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 222-279, April.
    3. Hall, Richard L. & Grofman, Bernard, 1990. "The Committee Assignment Process and the Conditional Nature of Committee Bias," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 84(4), pages 1149-1166, December.
    4. Murphy, Kevin M & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1993. "Why Is Rent-Seeking So Costly to Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 409-414, May.
    5. R. Arnold, 1981. "Legislators, bureaucrats, and locational decisions," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 107-132, January.
    6. repec:hrv:faseco:30747160 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Gerald A. Carlino & Robert M. Hunt, 2009. "What explains the quantity and quality of local inventive activity?," Working Papers 09-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism

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